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Do you have a favorite pot or pan?

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  • bernod
    replied
    Not me, but wifey's favorite is Le Creuset dutch ovens.

    Leave a comment:


  • Joan.of.the.Arch
    replied
    My overall favorite is the heavy aluminum pressure cooker my parents got for their wedding in 1946. I use it a lot without the pressure. I like the volume, the dimensions, the way it evenly disperses heat. It is my go-to popcorn pot. I used it today to cook a rich butternut squash soup.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wringer-Washer
    replied
    I have an old cast iron pan that I use all the time. It's well seasoned and really heavy, but makes for the best fried cut green beans, mushrooms, onions, whatever.

    If ever I scrape up enough money, I'd like to invest in a few pieces of Mauviel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishindude77
    replied
    I like my iron skillets and dutch oven.
    They don't see everyday use, but for things like fried potatoes, frying fish, etc. none of the conventional lightweight stuff comes compares.

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by msomnipotent View Post
    I have worked in two restaurants and everyone from the lead chef to the prep line use what would look like cheap throwaways, but they were razor sharp

    All that really matters is the steel and the balance, and a good whetstone to keep them sharp.
    Agreed. The material of the handle doesn't matter. As long as it fits well in your hand and is well balanced. And full tang (meaning the blade goes all the way through the handle) is a plus.

    As you said, the most important factor is the quality of the steel in the blade. Cheap knives are stamped out of sheet metal. They might be sharp when they are brand new but they don't hold their edge no matter how skilled you are with the whetstone. They are also typically thinner so the blade bends more which is both inaccurate and dangerous when cutting. Good knives are forged steel. They're thicker and stiffer, plus they will hold their edge better. They are also typically heavier and better balanced. Of course, they also cost more but it's well worth it.

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  • msomnipotent
    replied
    The only time I ever cut myself is when cleaning knives by hand. I have been washing all of my knives in the dishwasher forever, and I wouldn't have been able to tell which were the new knives if the wooden block wasn't aged on the old set. They can still cut down large primals and slice tomatoes easily.

    I have worked in two restaurants and everyone from the lead chef to the prep line use what would look like cheap throwaways, but they were razor sharp and had ugly plastic handles so we could still grip them when our hands were wet. Those are pro knives to me. I hadn't even heard of brands like Shun until long after I quit working. All that really matters is the steel and the balance, and a good whetstone to keep them sharp.

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by msomnipotent View Post
    I have 2 sets of JA Henckels Premio. One is at least 5 years old and the other is only a few months old (needed a set for the cottage). They are very good considering that you can get 14 pieces and a block for about $150. I don't baby them at all and always throw them in the dishwasher. The only care I give is a good sharpening with a whetstone.
    Two areas well worth spending money are cookware and knives.

    We got a set of Henckel Eversharp as a wedding or engagement gift. They were better than anything either of us had ever owned but it wasn't long before we realized they still weren't that great. From then, we started buying individual "real" knives one by one as we had the money. We would actually give each other stuff like that for holiday or birthday gifts. We're weird that way. So now we have pro quality Henckel knives. I'd say the most expensive was probably in the $150 range for the chefs knife. The smaller ones were cheaper. But it makes a world of difference.

    msomnipotent, if you are happy with your knives, that's great, but at the very least, stop beating them up in the dishwasher. They really should be hand-washed to avoid getting knocked around and damaging the cutting edge. Remember, dull or damaged knives are far more dangerous than sharp knives.

    Leave a comment:


  • msomnipotent
    replied
    Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
    my calphalon set I got 12 years ago after we got married is still being used pretty much daily. Love it. 2 pans, 2 pots and a bigger skillet. I also have a cast iron wok.

    what I really need is good knives. Mine are not great.
    I have 2 sets of JA Henckels Premio. One is at least 5 years old and the other is only a few months old (needed a set for the cottage). They are very good considering that you can get 14 pieces and a block for about $150. I don't baby them at all and always throw them in the dishwasher. The only care I give is a good sharpening with a whetstone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jluke
    replied
    vollrath stock pot for making spaghetti sauce.

    Leave a comment:


  • LivingAlmostLarge
    replied
    my calphalon set I got 12 years ago after we got married is still being used pretty much daily. Love it. 2 pans, 2 pots and a bigger skillet. I also have a cast iron wok.

    what I really need is good knives. Mine are not great.

    Leave a comment:


  • scfr
    replied
    Our rice cooker gets almost daily use.

    My favorite "go-to" pan is a 3-1/2 quart sautee pan with a lid and long handle. Because it's deep I use it as both pot & pan. I like that it's deeper than the typical pan and has a lid (less mess).

    I'm curious to read what SA forum members think about the Insta Pot. I keep hearing about it and am intrigued.

    Leave a comment:


  • msomnipotent
    replied
    The one I use most is a 12" high side pan from Tramontina that I use every day. I actually have 2 here and one at our cottage. It is better than All-clad, IMO. If you want good pans cheap, make sure you get Tramontina that is made in Brazil. My Tramontina set from Walmart was made in China and I can tell a difference.

    I have a shocking amount of cookware, especially considering that there are only 3 of us. I use it all except the pots and pans my grandmother gave me 30 years ago are used as spares now.

    The Insta Pot is on my Christmas list. From what I can see, the cheapest price for the 6 qt last year was on Cyber Monday through Amazon. That doesn't include Kohls if there was a 30% coupon and Kohls cash, though.

    Leave a comment:


  • kork13
    replied
    Just one? No. I love to cook, so all of my cookware receives alot of use. My stoneware baking pan & 2 pizza stones, a pair (8-/12-inch) of cast iron skillets, 2 cast iron enameled dutch ovens are almost enough for me to cook 100% of my normal dishes. I almost wish I had gotten all of those before I bought my set of anodized aluminum pots/pans--I might never have bought the set!

    Expanding the scope just a bit to include small appliances, I have my crock pots (3-/5-qt, used at least weekly), rice cooker (used 3+ times a week--though we've been considering replacing it with an Instant Pot as well) and my mother's electric wok from when I was a kid that also gets almost weekly use... Unfortunately, I'm finally replacing it with a steel stovetop wok, because the old one has been broken & repaired multiple times, and the heat control is no longer able to bring it fully up to temperature. I'm just having a hard time tossing my mom's wok, I'm too emotionally attached! lol

    Once you get familiar with how to cook with a particular set of cookware or techniques, you get comfortable with them and learn to love it. At least, for those of us with a passion for cooking. Other people (like my brothers & father) would be fine with nothing but a microwave.
    Last edited by kork13; 10-30-2017, 01:04 PM.

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  • snafu
    replied
    While I truly desire Le Creuset, I've never been able to give myself permission to spend that much for a cooking unit. I'm still using now 30 y/o Rubbermaid, 6 qt., lidded, enamel coated, cast iron pot on stove top or oven to sear, saute, brown, braise, stew, slo cook or roast meals. It's not chipped, looks good in spite of regular DW. The one issue is that it's heavy! If I were to buy another today, it would likely be 'Lodge' brand.

    I'm considering an Instant Pot and would appreciate SA views

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    I think most people probably have 2 or 3 items they use regularly. A 2-3 quart pot, an 8 inch pan, and a 12 inch pan are sufficient for most meals unless you have a bigger family.

    We actually just bought a new 8 inch pan the other day because the nonstick surface on ours was worn out.

    Leave a comment:

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