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    #16
    Originally posted by kork13 View Post

    Wasn't terribly easy, but I went into each of the main forums (General Discussion, Investing & Banking, Personal Finance, etc.), went to the very last page, noted when I joined the forums, and started clicking through the page counter 100 at a time until I found posts from that rough timeframe. Then clicked through each page until I found my opening post.

    What can I say, it was a Saturday afternoon & I got curious. Lol
    There’s an easier way.

    Do an Advanced Search for your user name and plug in the dates of the month you joined. I searched June 1 to June 30, 2006. Of course, that only works if you posted around the time you joined. If you lurked for a while and didn’t post right away, just expand your search parameters.
    Steve

    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

      There’s an easier way.

      Do an Advanced Search for your user name and plug in the dates of the month you joined. I searched June 1 to June 30, 2006. Of course, that only works if you posted around the time you joined. If you lurked for a while and didn’t post right away, just expand your search parameters.
      LOL! I knew there had to have been an easier way than brute-forcing my way through it... Hahahaha
      "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

      Comment


        #18
        2013
        Debt
        Student loan: ~90k of student loans,
        140k of mortgage

        Assets
        10k of emergency fund
        401k: 110k

        2020
        Debt
        Zero

        Assets
        40k emergency fund/savings
        50k Prepaid tuition
        35k peerstreet
        401k: 500k
        Stocks: 3 million
        Home equity: 900k
        Last edited by Singuy; 11-02-2020, 06:47 PM.

        Comment


          #19
          It says I joined: 6/27/2008.

          Age: 21 (1 year into my 1st career on the Railroad)
          Mortgage: $None
          Debt: -$10,000
          Portfolio value: ~$2500


          2020: according to one of my trackers.
          Age: 33 + 32 Y/o Wife (wife works fulltime, i'm working several part time jobs).
          Debt: ZERO
          R.E. Debt: Zero
          Portfolio value: $370k
          R.E. Value :$320k

          Very good organic progress, helps when you have a married team working at it. . Paid off all of my debt levers earlier this year. And getting my R.E. License now. All my growth will try to be focused on either *Very freeing simple ways to make decent money -or- following jobs/projects/ideas that i'm interested in already, or curious to learn. Trying to make money motivation one of my later requests.... Only thing that keeps this plan risky, is you're not safe unless you have at least 1 foot in a big corporation before your medicare age. Thankfully, my wife is holding our insurance hostage card, by her corporation. I'm hoping this (corporate insurance affordability) will be bucked soon though. My last ditch effort, is taking a loading job at UPS. Super part time, but you get the big corporate insurance. Otherwise I'll have to go back to corporate sales..... (not the end of the world, but I only want to do that as a last resort. )
          Last edited by amarowsky; 11-03-2020, 08:38 AM. Reason: added in my better half. She's been a big change that was pleasantly added in 2011 (married a several years later)

          Comment


            #20
            Joined 4/2010 at 29, the following are rough estimates off top of head.

            Debt: Mortgage 208K (1 yr in)

            EF: 24K
            401K: 6K (contribution rate 5%)


            2020 at 39:
            Debt: Mortgage 150K

            HE: 170K
            EF: 38K
            401K: 162K (up to 18%)
            Portfolio: 156K
            Saving/contribution rate: 30-32% of gross.
            "I'd buy that for a dollar!"

            Comment


              #21
              Joined in Feb 2008.

              Rough estimates for 2008
              Debt: Mortgage $100k
              Retirement and Investment Accounts including 529s: $600k

              Current
              Debt: None
              Retirement and Investment Accounts $4.3M
              529s: $166k
              EF: $80k
              Savings & Contribution Rate: 27% of gross (plus annual bonus)

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by srblanco7 View Post
                Joined in Feb 2008.

                Rough estimates for 2008
                Debt: Mortgage $100k
                Retirement and Investment Accounts including 529s: $600k

                Current
                Debt: None
                Retirement and Investment Accounts $4.3M
                529s: $166k
                EF: $80k
                Savings & Contribution Rate: 27% of gross (plus annual bonus)
                How did you manage to increase the Investments so much? Savings or investing? Amazing job!
                LivingAlmostLarge Blog

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post

                  How did you manage to increase the Investments so much? Savings or investing? Amazing job!
                  Just me speculating but look at the year when he had 600k, it was 2008. That's pretty much the bottom of the bull market so any modest contribution including such a high base number should get him to where he is.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post

                    How did you manage to increase the Investments so much? Savings or investing? Amazing job!
                    Thanks LAL. A combination of good fortune, a healthy savings rate, and solid stock market performance since the time that I joined this site accounts for the majority of the growth. I also was a shareholder in a privately held company that sold and netted me an additional $750k in early 2019. I had been slowly DCA-ing these funds into the market when the pandemic hit, and, though I've never been a market-timer, I used it as an opportunity to invest what remained, which has bolstered our returns this year.

                    At the risk of over-explaining, I accumulated my shares in the privately held company based on foregoing a bonus over a roughly 15 year period and instead opting to receive my bonus in Company shares. Ultimately, I believe this approach resulted in a higher rate of return than if I'd taken the bonus in cash and invested in the market, but I've never run the calculation to verify.
                    Last edited by srblanco7; 11-14-2020, 04:17 AM.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by Singuy View Post

                      Just me speculating but look at the year when he had 600k, it was 2008. That's pretty much the bottom of the bull market so any modest contribution including such a high base number should get him to where he is.
                      Fairly close to the bottom Singuy. Based on my tracking spreadsheet the $600k when I joined this site in Feb 2008 dropped to $460k in March of 2009. And, as you note, market performance since that time, has generally been solidly in positive territory.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by srblanco7 View Post

                        Thanks LAL. A combination of good fortune, a healthy savings rate, and solid stock market performance since the time that I joined this site accounts for the majority of the growth. I also was a shareholder in a privately held company that sold and netted me an additional $750k in early 2019. I had been slowly DCA-ing these funds into the market when the pandemic hit, and, though I've never been a market-timer, I used it as an opportunity to invest what remained, which has bolstered our returns this year.

                        At the risk of over-explaining, I accumulated my shares in the privately held company based on foregoing a bonus over a roughly 15 year period and instead opting to receive my bonus in Company shares. Ultimately, I believe this approach resulted in a higher rate of return than if I'd taken the bonus in cash and invested in the market, but I've never run the calculation to verify.
                        That's a nice bonus of $750k. Try and run simulations. I'm curious.
                        LivingAlmostLarge Blog

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post

                          That's a nice bonus of $750k. Try and run simulations. I'm curious.
                          Thanks for the prompt LAL, been meaning to actually run the numbers. Ran a simple simulation, assumed bonus each year was invested in S&P 500 fund and, in summary, appears I came out roughly 500k ahead by opting for company ownership. Validates what I'd presumed - but was interesting to actually run the calc.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by srblanco7 View Post

                            Thanks for the prompt LAL, been meaning to actually run the numbers. Ran a simple simulation, assumed bonus each year was invested in S&P 500 fund and, in summary, appears I came out roughly 500k ahead by opting for company ownership. Validates what I'd presumed - but was interesting to actually run the calc.
                            So you made more than double by betting on yourself over taking the cash bonus. Not a bad bet i would say.
                            LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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