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    Tutoring and extracurricular activities for kids...

    How not to let the kids down while saving more money on our future?

    I currently have two kids 13 and 16 y/o. Both of them are into Lacrosse and therefore, I have to pay for their coaching and equipment fees constantly. When it comes to tutoring, i started to teach them on my own using online resources like Khan Academy and StudyPug chemistry Intro to bonding instead of looking for a private tutor. However, I would like to save up for the future as I plan to buy a house for our family. I am wondering if there is a way to keep letting the kids play their sports while not needing to worry about the expenses so that I could save up.

    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by Kaoru; 05-03-2018, 12:08 PM.

    #2
    Originally posted by Kaoru View Post
    two kids 13 and 16 y/o.

    I am wondering if there is a way to keep letting the kids play their sports while not needing to worry about the expenses so that I could save up.
    What are each of them doing to earn money to cover their sports expenses? They are both plenty old enough to work. Sit them down and explain to them that if they want to continue playing sports, they need to start contributing to the costs.
    Steve

    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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      #3
      I was just going to say that. The 13 yo is old enough to babysit and mow lawns. The 16 yo can get a "real" job. My kids learned a ton of real life experience by having to work.

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        #4
        Thanks for the advice.

        You guys are right. I have always been too protective and wanted them to just enjoy their teenage lives. But I guess you guys have a point. Time for them to learn about independence and start working. However, i might need to think of a way to tell them.

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          #5
          Originally posted by Kaoru View Post
          i might need to think of a way to tell them.
          Sit down with them and explain that you are trying to save money to buy a house. To do that, you all need to work together to reduce spending and maximize income. One expense that isn't a necessity but that you would hate to have to eliminate is lacrosse, so they can keep playing but need to start earning some money to offset the cost.

          I don't know how much you spend each month for that but give them actual numbers so they understand how much it is costing you. Chances are they don't know.

          Something as simple as babysitting for a few hours each week can help a lot. I think the going rate is $10/hour so 4 hrs each week is $160/month or $320/month for both of them doing it. I'm guessing that's more than you spend on the sports stuff.

          That's just one example of something they could do but there are plenty of other ways they could earn money, especially the 16 year old.
          Steve

          * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
          * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
          * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

          Comment


            #6
            Personally, working a part time job as a teenager taught me a lot more about the real world than playing lacrosse ever could.

            I'm not saying to quit sports, but make it a condition of playing. Time to learn some time management skills and how to multitask. Juggling good grades, sports, and holding down part time employment should do that, and it will help them later in life when they are on their own and thrown out into the world.
            Brian

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              #7
              Originally posted by bjl584 View Post
              Personally, working a part time job as a teenager taught me a lot more about the real world than playing lacrosse ever could.

              I'm not saying to quit sports, but make it a condition of playing. Time to learn some time management skills and how to multitask. Juggling good grades, sports, and holding down part time employment should do that, and it will help them later in life when they are on their own and thrown out into the world.
              Yep, and as I showed, it might mean just a few hours each week. It doesn't have to be a big burden. Heck, getting a babysitting gig on Saturday nights when parents like to go out to dinner or a movie shouldn't be tough at all. 3-4 hours a week creates a nice income for a teen and would ease the household budget a lot so that you can boost the savings for the house.
              Steve

              * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
              * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
              * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

              Comment


                #8
                what is the plan when they graduate high school?


                ?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Enjoy their young years? As I recall from my teen days, I and all the teens I knew who had jobs DID enjoy earning money. Seriously, I don't remember anyone complaining about it.

                  Even the somewhat "spoiled" sisters I know look forward to getting a first job and earning on their own....I told the story here recently that one of them hopes to somehow be able to get a Lambourghini in order to drive to work at Burger King! Yeah, there are no plans for how to accomplish that.
                  "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

                  "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

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                    #10
                    Thanks for the great advice.

                    They plan to go to college after their graduation. And I guess they will understand. Thank you all for you advice! Really appreciate.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I was just thinking of this topic. I have a 13 year old that is involved in band. She also wants to join a park district team this summer, along with band camp, and then the 8th grade trip to DC. This year was a getting a little expensive because it isn't just "band" at school anymore. There is concert band, marching band, and wind ensemble, plus local competitions. Next year will add jazz band and a long distance trip if they are good enough. She is already contemplating a better instrument. There have been a few times when I wish she had a spare. She has a natural talent for music, so I don't mind spending on it. I'm not so sure about adding sports to the mix, especially when it is so competitive out here.

                      Not trying to be snarky, but has anyone that thinks the kids should get a job to pay for sports actually have kids in sports lately? It isn't like when we were young. They don't "play" sports. They train for the Olympics. My sister's kids practice soccer every day and have 2 games on the week ends. They are in kindergarten and 3rd grade. The older kids practice more. Even band takes up a lot of time now, and forget it when she has play rehearsal. She goes to band practice before school and rehearsal runs until 5 pm. She does her homework, eats, and goes to bed. Kind of hard to have a job then. And if I'm being really honest, summer is my fun time and I don't want her work schedule conflicting with our travel plans. I get burned out during the school year. I don't know how the teachers do it.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by msomnipotent View Post
                        Not trying to be snarky, but has anyone that thinks the kids should get a job to pay for sports actually have kids in sports lately? It isn't like when we were young. They don't "play" sports. They train for the Olympics.
                        That's actually a really good point. My daughter thought about getting involved in theater in high school but chose not to due to the schedule demands. It does make it hard to get an "after school" job when there is no "after school" time that isn't sucked up already.

                        At the end of the day, though, you can only let your kids do the activities that make sense financially for your family. You have to be ready and willing to say no when the expenses start getting out of hand.
                        Steve

                        * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                        * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                        * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I see a lot of parents sinking into debt keeping up with the joneses for their kids. I mean private school, activities, etc. It all adds up. Just public school and activities they start spending on weekend trips, eating out more, etc. It snowballs and suddenly it's $30k in debt.

                          Seriously consider where you will be in 10 years when the kids aren't doing activities and you're in debt? If you aren't in debt and can finance everything 100% great do it. I have no problem. it's a choice i fully support. but I can't see anyone financing their kids expenditures.
                          LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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                            #14
                            Where we live, you have to play a sport year-round to have any hope of playing on the high school team. So you're all-in, or you're not. But if you're all-in, there is no time for a job.

                            My son played competitive junior golf for years and essentially worked for himself instead of someone else, due to schedule problems in the summers. He painted curbs throughout neighborhoods (the street number of a particular house) for $20 each. On days he didn't have tournaments, he had some time to do this and make anywhere from $40-100 per day.

                            My daughter plays volleyball and is quite good, but to feed that talent, there is a lot going on in the summer. There's simply no time for a traditional job. She will be attending an elite camp in Virginia and at least two other positional camps this summer, and school ball essentially begins the last week of July. Not much extra time.

                            As for cost, we probably spend $8-10K per year on volleyball. Club team, travel, apparel, training, camps. You either find a way to fund it or you don't.

                            Things are sure different than when I was a child, but we manage the best we can.
                            Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

                            -George Carlin

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
                              I see a lot of parents sinking into debt keeping up with the joneses for their kids.
                              We see a ton of this at my kids' school. We know parents who drive Toyotas who are buying Mercedes and BMW SUVs for their kids a full year before they even have a license to drive. I have no idea the psychology behind that.

                              I could buy my daughter a Mercedes for her first car but I am not going to, and for a variety of reasons.

                              We are treating my son to a late model 4Runner for high school graduation, but he got $50K in scholarships and is a fine young man and we wanted to do it for him so he has a really good car for a really long time.
                              Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

                              -George Carlin

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