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    College athletics and your child

    I wasn't sure which category this goes in, but thought Personal Finance might be the best.

    We are now in the dizzying world of college recruitment for our daughter (volleyball). Wow this is an industry all its own. Here is what we are learning: If your kid is clearly good enough to play some level of college ball, you will likely know that by their freshman year in high school generally. They tend to stand out in their respective position. That doesn't mean they will be an Olympian, but they have a certain knack to do the sport that seems to come very easy, and they can probably play at the next level somewhere.

    If your kid has not been contacted indirectly (through your club or high school coach) by their sophomore year, they likely are not playing major college sports. The major universities have identified their talent for signing classes three and four years out from today. If they haven't ID'd your kid by their sophomore year, your kid isn't going there to play sports in all likelihood.

    If your kid DOES think they want to play college, and they feasibly have the talent, they have to start the process by their sophomore year, no later. That involves position camps, college combines, recruitment videos, emailing coaches, etc. Too many athletes decide they want to continue playing in college during their senior year in high school, and that is too late. Way, way too late.

    It is possible for a child who THINKS they want to play college sports to later decide that they DO NOT want to play college, but it is very difficult for a child who currently DOES NOT want to play college sports later decide that they DO: Their window is mostly shut, although junior college is a possibility.

    Most of the prestigious private universities in the U.S. are actually Division 3, for which there are no "athletic" scholarships. There are a few exceptions (Notre Dame, Wake, USC, etc.) but they are VERY FEW. But do not be discouraged: If one of these teams wants you on their team, they will find all sorts of OTHER scholarships to throw at you to get the price way down.

    As for my own child, who knows if she will go on to play in college. We will know a lot more 2 years from now. She might have the "want to" but not the "can do", or she might have the "can do" but no longer has the "want to." But we figured out pretty early in this process that "if you snooze, you lose."

    Feel free to post questions or thoughts on this subject. I am happy to answer or chime in as requested.


    Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

    -George Carlin

    #2
    Agree on the timeline & scholarships for d3. I know several people that got recruited at d3 schools and weren’t the best academically but still found a way to get a full ride.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by MooseBucks View Post
      Agree on the timeline & scholarships for d3. I know several people that got recruited at d3 schools and weren’t the best academically but still found a way to get a full ride.
      This. Generally speaking, we actually prefer the D3s. There are some very prestigious colleges out there that are D3. My daughter has ADHD, and this quite negatively affects her test scores, but we are hoping that one of these good schools might look the other way on the test score and look more at her high school grades and the fact that she's a pretty darn good volleyball player!

      Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

      -George Carlin

      Comment


        #4
        I cant imagine my kid playing college sports as she completely lacks the competitive drive, but I find this fascinating. When did your DD start playing volleyball? I play recreationally and my DD has been on the courts since she was born, but I still feel at 10 its too early for her to start playing even though I'm starting to see camps and even leagues for girls her age. I didn't start until 7th grade. Blows my mind how early kids get started in sports these days!

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          #5
          what are some D3 schools? Is this the same for say band scholarships?
          LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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            #6
            Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
            what are some D3 schools? Is this the same for say band scholarships?
            For band, if they do marching band some D1 lower popularity football schools might be better. I know of someone who got a partial scholarship & stipend to play for football/basketball games. Not sure that many D3 schools have band scholarships.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by riverwed070707 View Post
              I cant imagine my kid playing college sports as she completely lacks the competitive drive, but I find this fascinating. When did your DD start playing volleyball? I play recreationally and my DD has been on the courts since she was born, but I still feel at 10 its too early for her to start playing even though I'm starting to see camps and even leagues for girls her age. I didn't start until 7th grade. Blows my mind how early kids get started in sports these days!
              My daughter played several sports in elementary but didn't really enjoy any of them except volleyball. She began playing semi-travel club in 5th grade I believe. In the world of volleyball - and perhaps other sports - it is unusual to find a college athlete that didn't play club for 5-6 years. It is really about skill development. The talent is either there or it isn't.

              My son was quite a good junior golf, but I think he did it more out of compulsion than enjoyment, and when he figured that out, he quit altogether. He has never been happier.

              I don't know that my philosophy is correct, but I personally believe that a child needs to find a passion in something and pursue it. Parents need to push their children, though not ridiculously so. If we leave kids to their own devices, they do not learn the concepts of work ethic, goal setting, and working with others. Sports teaches this, but so do other things. We make our daughter go to training, even if she doesn't feel like it or doesn't want to, because that is life.

              We absolutely have pushed our children. We got extensive training for our son in golf, we pushed him in his singing, and of course his academics. While he gave up golf and singing in college, that is fine with mom and dad - those two things - especially golf, taught him many lessons for a fulfilling adult life.

              We see college volleyball as a tool to further help our daughter become a productive member of society.
              Last edited by TexasHusker; 02-07-2019, 05:53 AM.
              Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

              -George Carlin

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
                what are some D3 schools? Is this the same for say band scholarships?
                Most private universities in the U.S. are Division 3. A very few are Division 1, and even fewer Division 2. Just in Texas, there are number of very highly rated private, Division 3 schools including in no particular order:

                St. Edwards University
                Mary Hardin Baylor
                Hardin Simmons
                Trinity
                Southwestern
                Concordia (Austin)
                St. Mary's
                Howard Payne
                University of Dallas
                Austin College (Sherman)
                Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

                -George Carlin

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                  #9
                  I totally agree with finding a passion, but I struggle with the competitiveness of it at a young age. DD has played soccer for about 4 years, she did 3 years of baseball (although she opted not to play this year) and she's dabbled in some other things that didn't really stick. I believe the biggest lessons come from the socialization (especially for an only child like mine), learning teamwork and sportsmanship, having fun, staying active, etc. I also think clubs and sports heading into jr. high school are important for creating your circle and choosing the right crowd during highly impressionable development years. I can't imagine pushing her play competitively or on a travel team that consumes so much of our time at 11 or 12 though. I don't envy my friends who spend every weekend out of town at hockey or baseball or soccer tournaments.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by riverwed070707 View Post
                    I totally agree with finding a passion, but I struggle with the competitiveness of it at a young age. DD has played soccer for about 4 years, she did 3 years of baseball (although she opted not to play this year) and she's dabbled in some other things that didn't really stick. I believe the biggest lessons come from the socialization (especially for an only child like mine), learning teamwork and sportsmanship, having fun, staying active, etc. I also think clubs and sports heading into jr. high school are important for creating your circle and choosing the right crowd during highly impressionable development years. I can't imagine pushing her play competitively or on a travel team that consumes so much of our time at 11 or 12 though. I don't envy my friends who spend every weekend out of town at hockey or baseball or soccer tournaments.
                    11 might be too early, but after 12 it will likely be too late. Get her going in it. You will know within a few practices if it is something she really likes. If she doesn't love it, there is your answer.
                    Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

                    -George Carlin

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I went to a DII college (graduated in 2015). I'm not an athlete in any sense of the word, however, we had AMAZING athletic programs and, because the university was private, we had more private funding for scholarships, etc. A friend of mine's sister was recently given a full ride there for volleyball. Another friend received a full ride for flute performance. I myself was $5,000 a year short of a full-ride but it was still mostly paid for. I'd chat with her about looking at a smaller school. They may be able to find more funding for her AND she will have more one-on-one time with professors, etc. that may prove to be beneficial for her.

                      Congrats to you and your daughter during this exciting time! My mom and I spent TONS of time visiting college my sophomore and junior years.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        My son played D3 soccer for 4 years. (He started playing at the club level when he was 8.) It was a great experience for him. D3 sports are less demanding of your time than D1 sports. You have time to study, play sports, and have a social life. Many D3 schools give academic scholarships. They are not allowed to give athletic scholarships.

                        The D3 recruiting process is more laid back, unless you are trying to play at a school that is top-ranking for the sport you're interested in.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by moneybags View Post
                          My son played D3 soccer for 4 years. (He started playing at the club level when he was 8.) It was a great experience for him. D3 sports are less demanding of your time than D1 sports. You have time to study, play sports, and have a social life. Many D3 schools give academic scholarships. They are not allowed to give athletic scholarships.

                          The D3 recruiting process is more laid back, unless you are trying to play at a school that is top-ranking for the sport you're interested in.
                          Funny you say that - my son went on a recruiting trip to a D3 school for golf his junior year. We were all meeting with the coach, and my son asked "so what is a typical day like for a golfer here?"

                          He said the following for M-F:

                          630am workout
                          730am breakfast with the team
                          8:30am to noon - classes
                          12-1 lunch
                          1pm at golf course
                          1-3 - putting and hitting
                          3-?? play at least 9 holes, but 18 are required at least 3 of the 5 weekdays
                          Saturday and Sunday, no official practice, but 36 holes of golf on your own time are expected

                          So you are playing a bare minimum of 108 holes of golf per week

                          My son said "Wow so you do that every week?" He said "Son, I know we are D3, but I get paid to win and we aren't screwing around down here. You are going to find out real quick how much you like golf. And I need you to like it a whole lot, because I only sign two players in each class typically, and I can't afford a mistake."

                          He also said "No one leaves this campus unless it's cleared with me first."

                          That's when he decided he was finished with competitive golf.
                          Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

                          -George Carlin

                          Comment


                            #14
                            What is a Division 1 school? Division 2? Is it academics? size? Atheletics?
                            LivingAlmostLarge Blog

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
                              What is a Division 1 school? Division 2? Is it academics? size? Atheletics?
                              https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/NCAA_Division_I

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