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  • #16
    Originally posted by corn18 View Post
    Retired last Mar with 3 years cash. Now I am trying to justify why I have any cash. I used a lot of it to fund 2021 expenses so I didn't have to sell anything and pay huge taxes (had a giant severance). For 2022, we will spend more of the cash and have some left over. But now what? Do I sell and replenish the cash? That seems silly. Now I just have a huge cash drag all the time. Do I only sell at market highs? That is market timing which I suck at. So I think I am going to only have 3-6 months cash. Maybe a year's worth. Might pay myself every month, quarter or annually.

    It was nice starting retirement with boatloads of cash, though. One thing I did was include the cash in my AA. That way I wasn't overly conservative with the rest of my portfolio. I will say that life without a paycheck is different.
    You also have a military pension so I doubt holding tons of cash is necessary. how much do you have now? I think that holding cash in lieu of bonds is not a bad play to make. At least right now with savings and bonds paying peanuts. If they were paying something real then maybe the argument would be to hold bonds.

    I would also argue depends on your spending. If SS And pension cover spending and you don't need the dividends or capital gains of portfolio then it shouldn't matter how much cash.
    LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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    • #17
      Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post

      You also have a military pension so I doubt holding tons of cash is necessary. how much do you have now? I think that holding cash in lieu of bonds is not a bad play to make. At least right now with savings and bonds paying peanuts. If they were paying something real then maybe the argument would be to hold bonds.

      I would also argue depends on your spending. If SS And pension cover spending and you don't need the dividends or capital gains of portfolio then it shouldn't matter how much cash.
      LAL beat me to it. I was coming on to say the same thing. How much cash to hold in retirement is highly dependent on your income situation. If you have a pension and SS or any other guaranteed income, a large EF is less important and you're less concerned with market performance.

      I, on the other hand, will be completely self-funding retirement (until SS starts) so having a large cash position makes more sense.

      Also, holding cash will give us more flexibility when it comes to controlling our taxable income. That could be super important when we switch to ACA coverage. We've got 8 and 9 years before we each go on Medicare. The cost difference with and without the subsidy is significant.
      Steve

      * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
      * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
      * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by corn18 View Post
        Retired last Mar with 3 years cash. Now I am trying to justify why I have any cash. I used a lot of it to fund 2021 expenses so I didn't have to sell anything and pay huge taxes (had a giant severance). For 2022, we will spend more of the cash and have some left over. But now what? Do I sell and replenish the cash? That seems silly. Now I just have a huge cash drag all the time. Do I only sell at market highs? That is market timing which I suck at. So I think I am going to only have 3-6 months cash. Maybe a year's worth. Might pay myself every month, quarter or annually.
        You could have your investment income replenish your cash. Our portfolio threw off 100K in income last year. It mostly got reinvested but in retirement, we can have it paid out to us instead. We'll use that to live on and it will steadily get replenished throughout the year from interest, dividends, and capital gains.
        Steve

        * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
        * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
        * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

          You could have your investment income replenish your cash. Our portfolio threw off 100K in income last year. It mostly got reinvested but in retirement, we can have it paid out to us instead. We'll use that to live on and it will steadily get replenished throughout the year from interest, dividends, and capital gains.
          I don't reinvest investment income in my taxable account. I average about $11k/year from that and would just prefer not to get any. I am going to tax gain harvest and do Roth conversions from my 401k and that investment income mucks things up. The problem is one year I have $10k of qualified dividends and the next year it is $10k of non-qualified dividends. What's up with that? Huge difference in how they are taxed. Would just prefer none of my taxable investments spun off any income.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post

            You also have a military pension so I doubt holding tons of cash is necessary. how much do you have now? I think that holding cash in lieu of bonds is not a bad play to make. At least right now with savings and bonds paying peanuts. If they were paying something real then maybe the argument would be to hold bonds.

            I would also argue depends on your spending. If SS And pension cover spending and you don't need the dividends or capital gains of portfolio then it shouldn't matter how much cash.
            That's exactly what I am thinking. I think if I were living off my investments alone, I would maintain 3 years cash. And I think you are correct. Cash and bonds are about the same thing right now. That's why I include the cash in my AA. I actually have $100k cash sitting in my Roth because I had to rebalance last year back to 50/50. Couldn't find any bonds worth buying so it is just sitting in a MM account. If the market keeps tanking, I can buy some stock index funds with it and put it back to work. Or just do that now and accept a 55/45 AA.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by corn18 View Post

              That's exactly what I am thinking. I think if I were living off my investments alone, I would maintain 3 years cash. And I think you are correct. Cash and bonds are about the same thing right now. That's why I include the cash in my AA. I actually have $100k cash sitting in my Roth because I had to rebalance last year back to 50/50. Couldn't find any bonds worth buying so it is just sitting in a MM account. If the market keeps tanking, I can buy some stock index funds with it and put it back to work. Or just do that now and accept a 55/45 AA.
              You want bonds in 401k and stocks in Roth for balancing and allocation purposes. Also probably you want more bonds in taxable depending on size of things or stocks that you buy and hold that are growth and don't produce dividends.
              LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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              • #22
                My 401k is all bonds. Actually it’s a stable value fund paying 1.7% right now. Taxable is all stock and Roth is mostly stock. I would have sold some in my taxable to get to 50/50 but the capital gains tax would have been 23.4% last year. I’ll fix that this year since I can sell in my taxable account at 0% LTCG tax.

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                • #23
                  We have a decent pile of cash - our downpayment fund. A smaller pile is our 4 month emergency fund. I think there will be buying opportunities this year in the stock market but we unfortunately won't have a war chest to take advantage of that. Anything we save this year will go to the downpayment fund. Every dime is going to matter fron here on out.

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                  • #24
                    Well there goes the money on fire...
                    LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
                      Well there goes the money on fire...
                      Lol yep, I had an initial traunch of $5k from savings go into the market on Friday. Then I get to work this morning & my phone blows up with notifications that all of my "bad day" purchase limit orders have executed, and well below my limit price. I was busy, but looked enough to realize that my investment on Friday might just disappear (on paper) for a little while.

                      It seems that the sharp drop brought some interest from buyers though... Much of the market actually closed "up" today.
                      "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

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                      • #26
                        Everything is dropping. But what can you do? Corrections and bears happen.
                        LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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