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Lalaroe, Nerium, Avon, Herbalife, Amway, Isagenix, etc.

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    Lalaroe, Nerium, Avon, Herbalife, Amway, Isagenix, etc.

    Direct marketing sales. I know a lot of people on Facebook who tout the products that they sell but I often wonder how much they make and if it is even worth their time. Does anyone here sell in direct marketing and I know sales is not the most important factor rather recruiting new direct marketers under you plays a bigger role. The people at the top of the pyramid are reaping the most benefits.

    #2
    My wife sold Tupperware for a short time years ago. She wasn't very good at it quite honestly. She did it more for the discounts she got for her own purchases. She did host a few parties but really, once you've hit up the handful of friends and relatives willing to have a party, you're kind of tapped out.

    It's a bit better with a product line like Avon where people periodically reorder when they run out of something.

    Now she did sell in the pre-social media days. It's probably a little easier now when you can put your wares out there for the couple hundred friends you have on Facebook. Folks can look at the online catalog and not have to be bothered physically attending a party in your living room with a bunch of people they don't know. This way if they see something they like, they can just place an order without the obligation of showing up. I don't really know how that has impacted things.
    Steve

    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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      #3
      My sister has done a few but they were for some craft-type items. She kept her full time job and did it mostly as a hobby. She said it never made any money. Anything she did make mostly went to the stuff she bought or ended up keeping for herself.

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        #4
        Multi level marketing type items are generally seen as over priced trash because it's a middle man heavy business. It's generally best to purchase items with the least amount of middle man as each will take a percentage of profits from the item.

        I think if one really want to become wealthy and hustle with sales, real estate is probably a better option. The rest are just a waste of time.
        Last edited by Singuy; 10-18-2020, 12:37 PM.

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          #5
          And to piggy-back on Singuy's point multi-level marketing to me seems predatory looking for the next "sucker" to work under you selling the product.

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            #6
            Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
            My wife sold Tupperware for a short time years ago. She wasn't very good at it quite honestly. She did it more for the discounts she got for her own purchases. She did host a few parties but really, once you've hit up the handful of friends and relatives willing to have a party, you're kind of tapped out.

            It's a bit better with a product line like Avon where people periodically reorder when they run out of something.

            Now she did sell in the pre-social media days. It's probably a little easier now when you can put your wares out there for the couple hundred friends you have on Facebook. Folks can look at the online catalog and not have to be bothered physically attending a party in your living room with a bunch of people they don't know. This way if they see something they like, they can just place an order without the obligation of showing up. I don't really know how that has impacted things.
            From an outside observer, seems like most of those product service reps cater to female impulse purchases at work, at home, etc.

            The tech age extension of those type of sales is hawking products on social media. You can reach a much wider audience much quicker. This goes for literally any type of products, food service, crafts, etc etc.

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              #7
              Originally posted by QuarterMillionMan View Post
              And to piggy-back on Singuy's point multi-level marketing to me seems predatory looking for the next "sucker" to work under you selling the product.
              DW's friend tried to sell us on joining her circle with Primerica, effectively a MLM selling term life insurance & investments, advertising themselves as financial advisors. It was tempting, because I'm definitely interested in getting into the financial adviser role after the military, and I generally agree with the principles they advocate.... But the MLM slimey feeling (they swear up & down it's not, but it's the same model type), and the fact that the insurance & investments are all commission-based & more expensive than I would actually want to recommend kept me away.

              MLMs .... ugh..... If you enjoy working as a recruiter & training recruiters (and recognize that's what your job/income stream actually is), then have at it I guess. But I've got a friend who is (was?) literally a part of like 4 different MLMs, and I just couldn't deal with constantly getting sold to. Nice gal & still on friendly terms, but as Singuy stated, it tends to be an expensive way to purchase anything. My wife recently bought a bunch of Mary Kay junk -- I was gobsmacked by the cost, and asking her not to buy from them again.
              "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

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                #8
                Originally posted by ~bs View Post

                From an outside observer, seems like most of those product service reps cater to female impulse purchases at work, at home, etc.
                Totally. It is almost entirely a female-oriented market. I can't think of a single male-oriented one and I've never had a male friend invite me to a "party". Of course, there are plenty of products that aren't specifically for women like vitamins or cleaning supplies but the marketing is almost totally by and to women.
                Steve

                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I have seen more then one tax client shocked at how little they earned in their MLM hustle. They tended to think that their gross sales was the same as their net income.

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