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This guy just moved to a jungle to escape his student loan debt?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Scallywag View Post
    That's surprising because most preschools (at least in my area) require an associate degree in Early Childhood Education (ECE) and those that do hire non ECE candidates will make it a requirement for new hires to get their degree within X number of months.
    There are always at least 2 people in the room, a head teacher and a teaching assistant. She can't be a head teacher but she can be the assistant. It's not a long-term job for her but it kind of fell into her lap and was a perfect first job for her. Money is decent. Hours are good. And it will keep her from having a gap in her resume that she has to explain once she finds something more career-minded for her.
    Steve

    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

      Actually, you'd be surprised. I had peers in medical school who had degrees in almost every field you can think of. After graduating, and often after working for a few years, they decided they wanted to become doctors so they went back and took the science courses they needed to qualify for admission but they didn't get new degrees. So you very well might encounter a surgeon with an English degree or history degree or business degree. You do not need a science/pre-med degree to get into medical school.
      Well, of course they'd need the appropriate medical schooling as well as the english degree. lol Taking "easier" 4 year degrees,then switching to a different track at the master or doctor level isnt new.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Scallywag View Post
        That's surprising because most preschools (at least in my area) require an associate degree in Early Childhood Education (ECE) and those that do hire non ECE candidates will make it a requirement for new hires to get their degree within X number of months. Many also offer work / study where you work at the preschool / day care during the day and go to school during the evenings and weekends.

        Most English majors I know end up as journalists so that's another​​ path for her.
        ​​
        depends on your state, but teaching is 1 career path that generally doesnt require above a 2 or 4 year degree (at least at first), and doesnt require a specific degree. They have stardardized tests to pass before becoming a teacher though.
        Last edited by ~bs; 01-14-2019, 02:19 PM.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

          And, by the way, she made her final student loan payment last month so she is now debt-free 7 months after graduation.
          That is FANTASTIC!

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          • #50
            Unbelievable! When I think of my autistic son coming out of school where he got his associate's degree for medical coding and other stuff in a medical office. Since he was having trouble finding a job for what he trained for, he worked his high school grocery job and signed up at temp agencies. Finally got a part-time job and so worked it with the grocery store. Then the medical office gave him full time and he worked part-time at the store. Then he moved to be closer to his main job and save the cost of so much driving. So quit the grocery job, but as he had financial goals he wanted to meet he is working fulltime and part-time still. He had loans and through those years of balancing sometimes up to three jobs he had gotten them down to about the last thousand when my folks gave him a gift of money to finally finish them. What he did would be tough for anyone to go through and balance those jobs and paying off student loans and his car loan (no other debt - he doesn't own a credit card at 35) without having problems like autism. But he made it and I am proud of him. When the boss is away he is in charge! So for me to see stories like this guy's makes my blood boil. One assumes that he has no disabilities to put roadblocks up from finding a job he could do. How he couldn't live on the money he had coming in while living with mom is mind-boggling. He was making more than we live on! I would have loved to see what he was spending while living with mom. I wonder how his mom felt knowing she probably won't be seeing him again after coddling him. Wonder too what he is doing for a living in India. It seems more and more young people refuse to take responsibility for themselves anymore. I wonder if his wife is working and supporting him now.

            Why does anyone go for a degree in philosophy in the first place without a clear path of how they plan to use it? One of my older son's friend got his degree in Philosophy and one of the jobs he worked was at a call center! My son and the third Muskateer were landing jobs that made them money.
            Gailete
            http://www.MoonwishesSewingandCrafts.com

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Gailete View Post
              So for me to see stories like this guy's makes my blood boil. One assumes that he has no disabilities to put roadblocks up from finding a job he could do. How he couldn't live on the money he had coming in while living with mom is mind-boggling. He was making more than we live on! I would have loved to see what he was spending while living with mom. I wonder how his mom felt knowing she probably won't be seeing him again after coddling him. Wonder too what he is doing for a living in India. It seems more and more young people refuse to take responsibility for themselves anymore. I wonder if his wife is working and supporting him now.

              Why does anyone go for a degree in philosophy in the first place without a clear path of how they plan to use it? One of my older son's friend got his degree in Philosophy and one of the jobs he worked was at a call center! My son and the third Muskateer were landing jobs that made them money.
              I agree! I share your frustrations. When I first read/wrote about it I was LIVID. Then I realized there are plenty of people doing this. They simply run away from their debt instead of working out a way to take care of it. What always blows my mind when this is revisited is the amount he ran off for. A little more than $20K in debt was enough to send him packing... I can't wrap my mind around that. Just pay it and move on!

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              • #52
                the original post is hilarious and so concerning at the same time. Thanks for sharing!

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                • #53
                  does the urban jungle of philadelphia count?
                  Gunga galunga...gunga -- gunga galunga.

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                  • #54
                    Originally posted by greenskeeper View Post
                    does the urban jungle of philadelphia count?
                    Ha! Plenty of people are probably there doing the same thing LOL.

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Gailete View Post
                      Why does anyone go for a degree in philosophy in the first place without a clear path of how they plan to use it? One of my older son's friend got his degree in Philosophy and one of the jobs he worked was at a call center! My son and the third Muskateer were landing jobs that made them money.
                      Because parents, educators, social workers, etc drum it into kids to study what they're passionate about. Heck, I've seen it recently here on SA!!

                      From the time my son first showed an interest in acting, I told my kids that things like this are hobbies. Enjoy art, theater, etc on the weekends, and study for a Real Job that pays Real Money during the week.

                      For those who whine that it'll crush his spirit, I say "bah humbug". Humans have been working at soul-crushing labor for 200,000 years and we're no more special or entitled than they are.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Nutria View Post
                        From the time my son first showed an interest in acting, I told my kids that things like this are hobbies. Enjoy art, theater, etc on the weekends, and study for a Real Job that pays Real Money during the week
                        Of course, if everyone thought that way, pretty soon there would be no professional theater left for your son to enjoy on the weekends.

                        Thankfully, many of us recognize the value of the arts in our society and encourage people to pursue those careers if that's where their interests and talents lie.
                        Steve

                        * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                        * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                        * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

                          Of course, if everyone thought that way, pretty soon there would be no professional theater left for your son to enjoy on the weekends.

                          Thankfully, many of us recognize the value of the arts in our society and encourage people to pursue those careers if that's where their interests and talents lie.
                          My point was that he should act on the weekends in Community Theater. "Follow your blisters, not your bliss" so that you don't end up with a pile of SL debt, a degree in an economically worthless area and are poor the rest of your life, and do your bliss as a hobby.

                          (I'm so fortunate that my bliss is economically viable...)

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Nutria View Post

                            My point was that he should act on the weekends in Community Theater. "Follow your blisters, not your bliss" so that you don't end up with a pile of SL debt
                            The bolded part I totally agree with. I've said many times, there is nothing wrong with pursuing a lower-paying career, but you need to get an education that is financially in line with that. Don't borrow 6 figures to become a social worker. Lord knows we need good social workers, but go to community college for at least the first 2 years if not all 4. Don't go to some pricey private school.

                            The median personal income in 2016 was 31K. Broken down by demographics, the highest group median was 56K. Reality is that most people earn modest incomes. You need to choose a college path that matches up cost-wise with your likely income after graduation. The problem isn't people going into lower paying fields. The problem is how much they spend and borrow to get there.
                            Steve

                            * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                            * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                            * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
                              The median personal income in 2016 was 31K. Broken down by demographics, the highest group median was 56K. Reality is that most people earn modest incomes. You need to choose a college path that matches up cost-wise with your likely income after graduation. The problem isn't people going into lower paying fields. The problem is how much they spend and borrow to get there.
                              You hit the nail on the head there! Most students aren't being properly counseled on SL debt or repayment. I knew someone from school that was SHOCKED when she had to make her first SL payment. She said she didn't know she'd have to pay it back until she had a better paying job in her field (who told her that??). I think there should be more education about loans, interest rates, and other info.

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                              • #60
                                Originally posted by amastewa93 View Post

                                You hit the nail on the head there! Most students aren't being properly counseled on SL debt or repayment. I knew someone from school that was SHOCKED when she had to make her first SL payment. She said she didn't know she'd have to pay it back until she had a better paying job in her field (who told her that??). I think there should be more education about loans, interest rates, and other info.
                                Certainly education about loans could be better, but I also think some of it is just youthful ignorance and "head in the sand" behavior. The promissory note spells out all of the details clearly: when repayment begins, how much the monthly payment will be, etc. Most people just ignore all of that and figure they'll worry about it later.

                                And some of it is also the fault of parents and friends and relatives who actually encourage students to borrow as much as they want and worry about it later.
                                Steve

                                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                                Comment

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