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  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    I apparently didn't phrase my intention correctly. When I wrote WHEN THE HOUSE SELLS, I meant set aside for closing WHEN THE HOUSE SELLS.
    Gotcha. I think that's the way to go.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob B.
    replied
    Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
    I agree with riverwed. Don't pay down the mortgage. Set the cash aside to use for closing instead.
    I apparently didn't phrase my intention correctly. When I wrote WHEN THE HOUSE SELLS, I meant set aside for closing WHEN THE HOUSE SELLS.

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    Use the proceeds from new loan to pay down mortgage 1 to what is needed WHEN THE HOUSE SELLS.
    Originally posted by riverwed070707 View Post
    I think it's a reasonable plan, but I still think you'd be better off *saving* the difference between the value of the house and the sales price than you would paying down the existing mortgage.
    I agree with riverwed. Don't pay down the mortgage. Set the cash aside to use for closing instead.

    Leave a comment:


  • riverwed070707
    replied
    I think it's a reasonable plan, but I still think you'd be better off *saving* the difference between the value of the house and the sales price than you would paying down the existing mortgage. Then you have the cash on hand to bring to the table but its not tied up in the house should, for example, it not sell or the value turns out to be even lower than you expected. You're not going to be saving in interest over such a short amount of time, and the bottom line is you can guess what the market value is but the true market value is whatever someone is willing to offer you and you won't know that price until it sells.

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  • Bob B.
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    I've posted about my debt situation several times in the past. My wife and I are considering a monumental change. Before we go through with it, I'd like some comments from this forum. First, my current situation:

    Balance Int Monthly Payment
    Mort. 1 $104,165 6.25% $1125 (PITI)
    Mort. 2 (A) $30,000 0.00% $0
    Mort. 2 (B) $40,000 0.00% $0
    CC1 $7,931 8.90% $159
    CC2 $2,706 4.25% $140
    CC3 $2,088 5.23% $195
    CC4 $1,709 20.9% $60
    Van Loan $6,550 4.20% $210

    We owe two different family members a combined $70K on the house we currently live in. Our old house is rented out, and for sale, We are currently $25-30K underwater on the mortgage. Our original agreement with family members is to pay them when our old house sells.

    My proposal is to take out a 30 year morgage on the house we're currently living in. The house is worth about $72K. At 80% L/V ratio, we'd borrow $57,600. I would use that money to:

    1. Pay off all consumer debts (credit cards and van loan), freeing up about $760 in monthly cash flow.
    2. Pay Mort. 1 down by $28K, so it is not under water at current market value.
    3. Pay the rest to family members (about 12% of what we owe them)

    The $760 in new monthly cash flow would be split between the new mortgage, and family members. (assuming new morgage at about $300 per month).

    We have become much more financially disciplined over the past 18 or so months. I truthfully don't see us falling back into the credit card debt problem we've had in the past.

    Even though our family members have not asked to be repaid yet, we feel an obligation to begin paying them back.

    In the future when our house sells, we're going to have to come up with the $25-30K somehow.

    Sometime after the original house sells, we would plan to refinance our new mortgage to a 10 or 15 year payoff.
    I've augmented my plan. I've done a tax refund estimate that shows that we'll be getting a 5k refund.* What I would like to do is wait until March when we get our tax refund. Pay off $2,706** balance/$140 per month card, the $2,088 balance/$195 per month card and the $1,709 balance/$60 per month card.*** (I've projected that those balances will be low enough in March to be covered by the 5K refund) That will free up enough cash flow to make the payments on the new mortgage, without having to transfer balances to the new mortgage.

    Use the proceeds from new loan to pay down mortgage 1 to what is needed WHEN THE HOUSE SELLS. Pay 7K to family members right away, and make $700 payments per month until house 1 sells, then reasses.

    * Some may wonder why I'm getting such a big tax refund. I changed my withholdings on my W-4 last February. My tax refund would have been $900 greater ($75 per month). We have four children, or a $4,000 tax credit.

    ** When I originally posted, I mistakenly listed that debt with a 4.25% APR, it's actually 5.25%.

    ***I realize this leaves my highest balance/high interest rate card untouched. It's a matter of freeing up cash flow. To pay 5K against that card would not free up enough cash per month to make this plan work.

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  • Petunia 100
    replied
    Bob, I think it makes no sense to have the house listed above market. It is not going to sell above market, so it may as well not be listed at all. On the other hand, a home that is priced right will sell.

    You say your agreement with the family members is to pay them in full when the first house sells. So has the plan all along been to mortgage the second house at that time? If so, yes, go ahead and get the mortgage now, if you qualify. If you don't qualify, you might offer to let the lender pay some of your credit cards off in escrow from loan proceeds and see if that tilts you in the direction of qualifying.

    57.6k will not be enough to pay the family members in full, and you will net less. Certainly closing costs will be coming out of that, perhaps some credit card debt too. Will either family member be OK with letting you make payments on the balance?

    Another option you might explore is paying the credit cards in full (with loan proceeds) and begin repayment to family members with interest. If it were me, I would much rather pay my family member a reasonable rate of interest (say 5%) than pay a credit card lender 20%. If this is money the family member does not need immediately, a 5% return may be very appealing to them.

    If paying the family members in full at the time the house sells is mandatory, then where will the short fall come from? Have you considered doing a short sale? Given your circumstances, your lender may agree.

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  • Bob B.
    replied
    I've been thinking about this and analyzing from different angles ad nauseam for the past 24 hours, and I'll say that when trying to balance risk, total interest cost, and desire to pay back family members, there is no easy answer. It's impossible to satisfy three masters.

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    What about instead of a mortgage, we were to get a line of credit for up to 57.6K?

    Borrow maybe 10K now to transfer balances from 2 high int. CCs. Freed up cash flow goes to credit line and family.

    Once house 1 sells, use credit line to pay off balance due on mort 1, and pay rest to family?
    There are a couple of problems with a line of credit.

    1. The rate is typically higher than with a fixed rate mortgage.
    2. The payments may be higher. I'm not sure how they structure the term but I don't believe it is for 30 years.
    3. The rate is variable so it could climb over time.
    4. If anything were to change in your credit worthiness, they could freeze your line and not allow you to take out any more money.

    I think the mortgage is the better route.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob B.
    replied
    Thanks for all your replies so far DS.

    What about instead of a mortgage, we were to get a line of credit for up to 57.6K?

    Borrow maybe 10K now to transfer balances from 2 high int. CCs. Freed up cash flow goes to credit line and family.

    Once house 1 sells, use credit line to pay off balance due on mort 1, and pay rest to family?

    Leave a comment:


  • riverwed070707
    replied
    I agree with Steve. If you're going to take out the mortgage, elimnate the step of paying down the 1st mortgage and just reduce the price to something that will make it sell. Then use what you've borrowed to have the money to bring to the table at closing. It doesn't make sense to pay it down before you sell.

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    My thought on sending that money towards the mortgage sooner rather than later - It's at a 6.25% int rate. To reduce the princ. by 28K now would mean $330 per month going toward princ. rather than the $195 per month going toward princ. as is.
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    The house has been listed at a price that would cover what we owe on it, plus cover most of the commissions, taxes, etc. (108K). That's why I want to pump some money toward the mortgage. So we can sell it and not have to bring money to the table. We have no money to bring to the table.
    You're correct that prepaying the mortgage would save you interest but given your situation, I think holding the cash is a better strategy. Then cut the asking price to market value and when it sells, use the cash to cover the difference between what you owe and what it's worth.

    Personally, I wouldn't give a bunch of money to the family until the house was settled just in case you need a couple extra thousand dollars at closing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob B.
    replied
    Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
    I'm confused. You said the house was currently for sale. Is it not listed at market value? If that's the case, why not? What's the point of having it on the market at an unrealistic price? It won't ever sell that way.

    You are currently losing at least $225/month on the property. The longer you keep it, the more in the hole you are.
    The house has been listed at a price that would cover what we owe on it, plus cover most of the commissions, taxes, etc. (108K). That's why I want to pump some money toward the mortgage. So we can sell it and not have to bring money to the table. We have no money to bring to the table.

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    EF = $1,650 so, no not 6 months.
    I would pump up the EF before paying down the mortgage or repaying the family. The rental is losing money every month and if the tenants leave, you're really in trouble, or if the place needs a costly repair.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob B.
    replied
    Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
    Is the rent on home 1 covering your costs? If not, rather than paying down the loan, I'd probably hold that money in reserve in case you need it. Then when the house sells, you can use it to cover the balance on the loan.
    My thought on sending that money towards the mortgage sooner rather than later - It's at a 6.25% int rate. To reduce the princ. by 28K now would mean $330 per month going toward princ. rather than the $195 per month going toward princ. as is.

    Also, if I were to park it in a CD, were talking what? 1% or less interest earned.

    But, yes I see your point in having something in reserve.

    Maybe 1/2 toward principal now, and 1/2 in reserve?

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob B. View Post
    Our old house is rented out, and for sale

    The hope is that with the new borrowing we would be put into a position to be able to list the house at current market value, and sell more rapidly.
    I'm confused. You said the house was currently for sale. Is it not listed at market value? If that's the case, why not? What's the point of having it on the market at an unrealistic price? It won't ever sell that way.

    You are currently losing at least $225/month on the property. The longer you keep it, the more in the hole you are.

    Leave a comment:

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