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6 Tips to Renovate Your Kitchen before Selling

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    6 Tips to Renovate Your Kitchen before Selling

    Renovating any part of your home in readiness for selling is quite different to renovating for your comfort and enjoyment for the next 10 to 20 years. On one hand, you do not want to spend so much not knowing whether and when you will get returns on your investment. On the other, you also donít want to look cheap or to lower the value of your home by using inferior materials or designs. If you are thinking about kitchen remodeling long island, it is important to realize that there is a big difference between kitchen remodeling and simply staging the kitchen to make a quick sale.
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    Flooring
    Counter Tops
    Lighting
    Cabinets
    Budget

    Redesigning your kitchen before selling your house should be a priority when you want to attract buyers. The kitchen is your best selling point for the house and needs to look functional and attractive.

    #2
    Funny how a lot of people want these great kitchens yet many of those people do not even cook. You can thank HGTV for that.

    Oh...and for those who have stucco ceilings (or the idiots who call them popcorn ceilings)...I wouldnt rush to scrape it off. In a couple of years that will be the hot thing and HGTV will be shoving it down your throat at which point everyone will be making fun of the "smooth" ceilings. Kinda like what they did with stainless appliances. You hardly hear anything about those anymore. Even granite counter tops arent being pushed anymore either.

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      #3
      Renovating kitchens and bathrooms are probably the most expensive things that you can do. And neither one will add that much value to your house. You will most likely always put more into the renovations than you will get out of them when it comes time to sell. If you want to do it for yourself, that is one thing, but I wouldn't expect a renovated kitchen to add too much to the asking price.
      Brian

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        #4
        Having recently renovated a home so I could sell it for top dollar, I disagree with almost everything posted in this thread so far EXCEPT for the fact that yes, kitchens/bathrooms are the more expensive rooms in a home to remodel. Return on investment will really depend on the remodeling needs and strategy. In my experience, the return was phenomenal, it paid for itself and then some.

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          #5
          Originally posted by bjl584 View Post
          Renovating kitchens and bathrooms are probably the most expensive things that you can do. And neither one will add that much value to your house. You will most likely always put more into the renovations than you will get out of them when it comes time to sell. If you want to do it for yourself, that is one thing, but I wouldn't expect a renovated kitchen to add too much to the asking price.
          I completely disagree with this. Only when the renovations aren't done properly or with the local real estate environment in mind should you ever lose money on a kitchen or bathroom reno. Sometimes people take a good kitchen, spend a lot of money to make it a great kitchen, and don't get that money back, but in those cases the kitchen probably didn't need the investment that was put in. But when a kitchen is clearly outdated and a proper renovation is done, your return on investment can be much higher than 100%. Kitchens and bathrooms have the highest return on value of any room in the house.

          You just have to know what to change, what to leave alone, and what people are going to want. In selling you also have to consider the time on the market, or time unoccupied if you're renting, as both cost you money. Selling or renting something quicker because of a reno can save money, though it's hard to calculate into the ROI because you never know how long it would have taken to sell/rent had you not done the reno.

          I have done two kitchen/bathroom renos, both of which have brought in excess of a 100% ROI.

          As a note it's interesting to see the conversation that has occurred because of what the OP's post, which I'm pretty sure was a robot posting so they can later spam.

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            #6
            Originally posted by siggy_freud View Post
            As a note it's interesting to see the conversation that has occurred because of what the OP's post, which I'm pretty sure was a robot posting so they can later spam.
            That's how a lot of threads start around here...I agree, it's amusing to watch.

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              #7
              My attention perked up with this topic because I would like to renovate our kitchen. The kitchen has never been updated--and a lot has changed since the house was originally built almost 50 years ago.
              A few years ago I was thinking of gutting the kitchen and starting all over again with a kitchen designer. But, recently I have been thinking maybe a scaled back plan would be better--like new floors, new sink, new counter tops and back splash and call it a day.
              If I knew what our plans were going to be in 5-10 years it would help me to make my decision. If we were going to stay here, then the new kitchen would make sense. (Although, one thing that intimidates me is that the kitchen would be out of service for a long time if we did the total gut. )

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                #8
                Do a search on "refinish kitchen cabinets" and you will find a host of videos on using gel stains to revitalize tired looking wood that has gotten dirty or dried or lost its sheen. A co-worker's wife did this and had amazing results. We are planning on doing it this coming winter, and then saving up for better counter tops. Some time after all that, the appliances and lighting.

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                  #9
                  Granite countertops have really dropped in price the past couple years, my brother just had his done for around 3k
                  retired in 2009 at the age of 39 with less than 300K total net worth

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