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    #16
    I took the statement to be more of a statement of priorities, not necessarily the actual cost. It is not uncommon to see people lined up to pay large sums of money on a new phone (the reasons might be vanity or status) when a lower cost phone or their current one would do just fine.

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      #17
      Originally posted by JoeP View Post
      I took the statement to be more of a statement of priorities, not necessarily the actual cost.
      That's probably what was meant but it was very poorly stated. Using the example of the phone just made no sense at all. Sure, I could buy a $50 flip phone instead of a $500 iPhone but that savings wouldn't even cover health insurance for one month. It made it seem like the speaker was just really out of touch with how expensive health insurance really is.
      Steve

      * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
      * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
      * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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        #18
        I just want to pop in here and say that I totally agree with MJenn's statement (and others who have had similar remarks).

        I find, especially from people who tend to have their financial lives in order, that there tends to be scorn toward those who are less fortunate, under the guise of trying to give good guidance.

        You can make all the assumptions you like about the financial predicaments of those waiting in line for the iphone, but you truly don't know what their story is. And neither does this politician. AND it isn't at all relevant to healthcare, so he really would have been better off keeping his trap shut.

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          #19
          Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
          That's probably what was meant but it was very poorly stated. Using the example of the phone just made no sense at all. Sure, I could buy a $50 flip phone instead of a $500 iPhone but that savings wouldn't even cover health insurance for one month. It made it seem like the speaker was just really out of touch with how expensive health insurance really is.
          Agreed. They are separate issues, and the attempt to link them was an obvious admission of his disconnect with the real issue at hand: the high cost of healthcare, not the "high" cost of an iphone.

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            #20
            Originally posted by HundredK View Post
            I just want to pop in here and say that I totally agree with MJenn's statement (and others who have had similar remarks).

            I find, especially from people who tend to have their financial lives in order, that there tends to be scorn toward those who are less fortunate, under the guise of trying to give good guidance.
            Agreed. I feel as though many of my fellow countrymen have an us vs them mentality on both sides of the aisle. We need to realize that most who are less fortunate are not lazy or unmotivated and need assistance to get out of their predicament. Spending 20%+ of your income on health insurance is just not feasible.

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              #21
              TexasHusker - My apologies. I was attempting to edit your last post to this thread and accidentally deleted it.

              I was able to recover it from my phone so here it is.

              There's no free lunch. Someone has to pay for it.

              I'm one of the "fortunate" making well over $200K a year, and I'm still paying 20% a year +/- for my own family's health care.

              Yet they [moderator edited language] want to continuously raise my tax bracket so I can pay for other people's insurance, too.

              I hazard to guess that most people commenting on Obamacare are not even on Obamacare. Most are in employer plans where the employer is paying half or more of the cost.
              Steve

              * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
              * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
              * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

              Comment


                #22
                Regarding your last line above, TH, I comment on the ACA a lot. No, I am not insured through it. I do have coverage through my employer but I pay for it 100%. Next month, hopefully, we will get new insurance through my other job. I'll pay for that 100% also. In fact, it will actually be over $40/month more than my current plan but the coverage is a lot better. Still, our insurance costs will rise by about $500/year.
                Steve

                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by msomnipotent View Post
                  Everyone should "have skin in the game" as it were.
                  Interesting comment. I once had to have a biopsy, and I really wanted to know how much it would cost. Not that I was going to shop around for a cheaper price but - you know, I like to know how much my bill is going to be.

                  Turns out no one could or would tell me. The department doing it said I had to ask billing. Billing said, No, you have to ask the medical department doing the procedure.

                  I don't like when politicians talk about how patients drive up the cost by getting unnecessary or expensive procedures - but the truth is, insurance regulations state by state govern disclosure about costs and procedures.

                  My state says, you don't have to tell someone in advance what things will cost.

                  And I don't know about you, but I've never once woken up and thought, Hmmm, I'm really in the mood for an X-ray today. It's the doctor who makes those decisions/recommendations. (Obviously I could have refused, but I wanted to know if something needed fixing. Luckily it didn't. Cost: $200)

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by cornfieldj View Post
                    Interesting comment. I once had to have a biopsy, and I really wanted to know how much it would cost. Not that I was going to shop around for a cheaper price but - you know, I like to know how much my bill is going to be.

                    Turns out no one could or would tell me. The department doing it said I had to ask billing. Billing said, No, you have to ask the medical department doing the procedure.

                    I don't like when politicians talk about how patients drive up the cost by getting unnecessary or expensive procedures - but the truth is, insurance regulations state by state govern disclosure about costs and procedures.

                    My state says, you don't have to tell someone in advance what things will cost.

                    And I don't know about you, but I've never once woken up and thought, Hmmm, I'm really in the mood for an X-ray today. It's the doctor who makes those decisions/recommendations. (Obviously I could have refused, but I wanted to know if something needed fixing. Luckily it didn't. Cost: $200)
                    I used to work in hospital billing. I can tell you that the pricing schemes within healthcare are so convoluted that not a lot of people can tell you what a bill will be in advance. Depending on what type of insurance you have, it will depend on what charges are added (which depends on what the doctors and nurses order for your treatment), what diagnosis and procedure codes are added, and how many professionals are involved. A hospital can't tell you what a doctor or other specialist will charge because their bills are separate. The best place to ask would be your insurance company. They can at least tell you what they are contracted to pay at each hospital and doctor if your doctor's office can give you the codes.

                    On a related note...
                    I'm worried about their talk of allowing lifetime maximums again. My RA drugs run over $4,000 per month if you look on the bill. I called the pharmacy intermediary or whatever it is. It isn't my insurance but I have to order through them. I asked to be able to go back to Walgreens instead of having it shipped because it is cheaper, less waste, and I don't trust UPS to deliver something that has to stay at a constant temperature and can't be shaken. And then I"m told that they don't actually pay the bill amount. So if I'm being "billed" over $4,000 towards my LTM and they don't actually pay that, I'm seeing a lawyer.

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                      #25
                      Me too about asking how much things are. I know DH's specialist test is about $20k for the visit. Once every 2 years and all day. His recent diagnosis was through a clinical trial so now we have to see if th1e insurance company will pay for a legal diagnosis confirmation. That is life.

                      Lucky for us this visit we timed to happen right before he quit and got out of employer provided coverage and now 2 years later he has employer provided coverage so he could go. Otherwise we discussed it and decided we would have paid anyway out of pocket because he's been going now for about 14 years and we needed the continuing monitoring.
                      LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by cornfieldj View Post
                        And I don't know about you, but I've never once woken up and thought, Hmmm, I'm really in the mood for an X-ray today. It's the doctor who makes those decisions/recommendations. (Obviously I could have refused, but I wanted to know if something needed fixing. Luckily it didn't. Cost: $200)
                        I know doctors sometimes have affiliations with certain labs, but for the most part if he/she wants you to get an x-ray he/she doesn't really care where you get it.

                        That being said, getting that information certainly isn't easy or convenient. Being put on hold, dealing with attitudes, and like others have said not always getting the price information anyway.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by PeggyHefferon View Post
                          I know doctors sometimes have affiliations with certain labs, but for the most part if he/she wants you to get an x-ray he/she doesn't really care where you get it.
                          We don't have any affiliation with a lab. We send patients to the lab that their insurance company requires them to use.

                          As for x-rays, that depends on the insurance. For some insurances, we are capitated to a particular radiology site. All of our Aetna patients, for example, get sent to one location. With other insurances, patients can go anywhere that accepts their plan.
                          Steve

                          * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                          * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                          * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by cornfieldj View Post
                            I once had to have a biopsy, and I really wanted to know how much it would cost.

                            Turns out no one could or would tell me.
                            As msomnipotent said, there's really no way for them to tell you the cost of a surgical procedure upfront. That's not how the system works. You and I could go in for the same procedure but have different bills. Why? You might get different anesthesia. I might be in recovery longer. You might have post-op bleeding that requires additional care. I might have a reaction to the pain medicine they give me that results in additional care and charges. You might get more IV fluids than I do. The possibilities are endless.

                            Some clinics have started coming up with flat rate pricing for things. They do that knowing that they might lose money on some cases but make it up on others. They hope it will average out over time.
                            Steve

                            * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                            * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                            * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
                              We don't have any affiliation with a lab. We send patients to the lab that their insurance company requires them to use.

                              As for x-rays, that depends on the insurance. For some insurances, we are capitated to a particular radiology site. All of our Aetna patients, for example, get sent to one location. With other insurances, patients can go anywhere that accepts their plan.
                              Perhaps that has changed over the years, but I recall years ago a couple of my doctors had preferred labs they sent patients to. One actually was part owner of the facility.

                              But I haven't been to a traditional PCP in many years now. Prior to getting laid off, I went to the company wellness center for almost all my medical needs. And yes, that include my lady visits.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                I believe that health care is important and it is something that people should get.. New phones on the other hand, as long as you purchased a plan, it's not that heavy in the pockets. There is nothing cheap when it comes to health and ourselves these days. I guess you would have to pay out more money in hospital bills, etc if we dont have health insurance.

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