Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TV Question - How Long Do Streaming Devices and Indoor Antennas Last?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    TV Question - How Long Do Streaming Devices and Indoor Antennas Last?

    We lived without cable for 10 years when we were in our last house. We had a TV, an outdoor antenna, and a DVD player. We paid $0 in monthly fees, but had the upfront cost for the antenna (plus the TV and DVD player).

    Right now we're in an apartment and paying for cable, but we plan to buy a house before the end of the year so I'm once again thinking about how best configure our TV viewing. I'm trying to calculate total monthly cost (minus electricity). We're at a point in our lives when we can indulge in some little luxuries without derailing our financial plans. So it's not a question of whether or not we can afford it, but of whether or not the cost is worth it to me.

    I'd like to get Disney+ ... with an annual subscription, it will be $6.33 per month including tax. And I've grown really fond of the DVR feature with our current cable, so I want that option.

    I know I'll need to buy an antenna and some sort of streaming device. I've done some research and figure I'll spend roughly $195 including tax.
    My question is: For those of you who own them, how long do streaming devices and indoor antennas typically last before they start to go wonky or become obsolete? I need a ballpark idea so I can estimate the monthly cost of those devices.

    Thanks.

    #2
    Streaming devices & antennas are both fairly inexpensive. For streaming, we use Google's Chromecast, which I think cost ~$40. We've only had it for ~2 years, but I know folks who have had Roku or Amazon's FireStick (other options) since at least 2012 or so.

    The antenna is a thing of beauty... there's really no technology to become obsolete -- it's literally just a coil of wire that picks up ambient TV signals. My dad's been using his for probably 12 years, and he also has a DVR (of some sort) connected to it to record a couple shows. The things are basically bullet proof, and as long as the antenna (or its cabling) isn't physically damaged, you'll have free local channels at your fingertips, almost indefinitely.
    "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

    Comment


      #3
      I agree with kork. An indoor antenna should last a few decades.

      For the streaming device, the question is how long before it’s obsolete and there’s really no way to know. Technology advances quickly. But as noted, they’re cheap, under $50. If you have to replace it every 8-10 years it’s not a big deal.
      Steve

      * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
      * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
      * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks kork13 and disneysteve . It sounds like we'd be looking at about $2 per month spread out over the life of the equipment, so just a little over $8/month total with the subscription. That's a price I'm definitely willing to pay.

        Comment


          #5
          Indoor antennas are fairly cheap.
          But if you are in a rural area or an area with lots of hills and valleys, then you'll need to go with a large outdoor rig.
          That can get pricey
          Brian

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by bjl584 View Post
            Indoor antennas are fairly cheap.
            But if you are in a rural area or an area with lots of hills and valleys, then you'll need to go with a large outdoor rig.
            That can get pricey
            Thanks! Prior to posting I did some research (antennaweb.org, Crutchfield, Clark Howard, Consumer Reports, random tech web sites) and know the smallest/cheapest versions won't work where we plan to buy, but we won't need the biggest outdoor versions either. My budget of $195 should cover what we will need & want for a streaming device + antenna + tax. Definitely some folks could get away with less expensive versions, and some would need to pay a lot more. My original post was selfishly all about me, trying to figure out how long I could expect the equipment to last. But for anyone thinking of doing the same, definitely do the research on what will work in your area and absolutely factor in the cost of the equipment and think about what that upfront cost will translate to per month.

            P.S. - Adding that with an outdoor rig you are may need to pay someone to install for you unless you have the know-how to do that safely. The last antenna we had was outdoors and we hired someone to install which added to the cost.
            Last edited by scfr; 06-12-2020, 08:23 AM. Reason: Added P.S.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by scfr View Post

              Thanks! Prior to posting I did some research (antennaweb.org, Crutchfield, Clark Howard, Consumer Reports, random tech web sites) and know the smallest/cheapest versions won't work where we plan to buy, but we won't need the biggest outdoor versions either. My budget of $195 should cover what we will need & want for a streaming device + antenna + tax. Definitely some folks could get away with less expensive versions, and some would need to pay a lot more. My original post was selfishly all about me, trying to figure out how long I could expect the equipment to last. But for anyone thinking of doing the same, definitely do the research on what will work in your area and absolutely factor in the cost of the equipment and think about what that upfront cost will translate to per month.

              P.S. - Adding that with an outdoor rig you are may need to pay someone to install for you unless you have the know-how to do that safely. The last antenna we had was outdoors and we hired someone to install which added to the cost.
              Indoor set ups are pretty simple. Just plug into the back of the TV or receiver box.

              Outdoor, you may need an installer.
              Mounting things to the roof or building towers can be difficult.
              There are also setups that require two antennas that need to be linked together with a special receiver box.
              That can be a complicated setup if you've never done one.

              Brian

              Comment

              Working...
              X