Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Energy saving Tips

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Energy saving Tips

    I am new to the forum, but I would like to take the time and share a few tips on saving energy. Costs just keep going up, and I think everyone could use a little advice and ideas on this subject.


    1. Let the Sun Shine In during the winter. Open window coverings during the day to let in the warmth of the sun, and close them at night.
    Keep the Sun Shine out during the summer. Close window coverings during the day to keep the warmth of the sun out and lower your cooling bill.


    2. Install a programmable thermostat compatible with your heating and cooling system. These new programmable thermostats are proven to lower energy cost when in comparison to the older ones that use mercury. Make sure to set it comfortably low in the winter and comfortably high in the summer.


    3. Try Compact Fluorescent bulbs to light up your home. Not only do these bulbs use much less energy, but they last a lot longer than regular bulbs. The upfront cost is a little higher, but they pay for themselves in energy savings.


    Ok guys, let keep this rolling. Help and be helped, I always say.
    thanks Charlie

    #2
    Great tips. Let me add another one:

    1. Throw away old style microwave, hair dryers, electric shavers etc. They consume way too much energy. Buy the newer models which consumbe much less energy.

    Comment


      #3
      Don't forget to simply pay attention! Turn off unnecessary lights and fans when you leave the room and unplug appliances that aren't in use that may being drawing small amounts of electricity.

      Comment


        #4
        Energy-Busting Changes for the Old House

        Our family has found the following helpful for bringing down energy use and billing amounts:

        1. We had a 52-year-old oil furnace when we first took possession of our home. Two winters of paying to refill an oil tank to fuel a barely efficient furnace were enough for us to choose natural gas, and an 85% efficient furnace and water heater.

        2. Upgrade the windows if they are old.
        3. Upgrade the insulation where you can.

        4. Replace the doors. We replaced our original wood door with a heavier fiberglass door, and here is where we could see the cumulative effect of our windows, insulation, and heating fuel choices. Ten years ago we were paying $400+ every six weeks during the winter for oil. Now our heating bills average to $63/month.

        And we've done the programmable thermometer, keeping the temperature in the house between 64-66F during the day, and 58F at night when the nights are long. Used compact fluorescents, changed our bulbous Cathode Ray Tube monitors and desktop computers to laptops with optional flat screen monitors for movie nights. The only thing I haven't done that maybe I should, until I read further comments, is turn off the power bar connecting the DVD player, VHS player, Nintendo Wii and the television set, because we rarely use the television.

        Comment


          #5
          Guys These are some awesome tips!

          Here is another good one. Turn your water heater thermostat down to 120F, your water heater accounts for about 13% of your home energy costs.

          Charlie

          Comment


            #6
            Attic and crawl space insulation is easy to add and can be done as a weekend project. Also insulate your attic doors and hot water supply lines. Remove any old or damaged insulation and replace it with new. Replace old weather stripping in exterior doors.

            Comment


              #7
              Don't forget to insulate around where pipes and cable and such come in as well. Use a insulated hotwater heater blanket. Also you can buy or make foam insulation sheets for outlets and switches on exterior walls. Keep closet doors closed--why pay to heat them?

              Comment


                #8
                also in my house the water pipes leading to the washing machine are on an outside wall facing the deck. I have to put bales of straw in the winter time to keep the pipes from freezing. We have already added insulation but this year it doesnt seem to be enough

                Comment


                  #9
                  Irmanator, try electric heating tape. You plug it in and wrap or press it along the length of your vulnerable pipes. You only need plug it in when the weather is cold enough to freeze pipes. Can save you a bundle on plumbing and flood cleanup (when the mess thaws out).
                  "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

                  "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

                  Comment


                    #10
                    yep, got new windows this past November and already our gas bills are about 40 to 50 percent lower than this time last year! Plus a tax write off on the purchase of the windows!!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Plant some trees around your house. Not only does it provide oxygen, but it raises home and neighborhood values. Plus the shade keeps your home cooler in the summer. Your air conditioner will thank you for it, and if it's not working as hard it will last you longer.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        One thing we do in Australia, that I noticed most Americans don't is hang our clothes to dry. Everyone has a clothes line in the backyard, even massive blocks of units/flats/apartments have communal clotheslines. Most people don't use dryers unless we have to and it saves hundreds of dollars a year.

                        Switch everything off at the wall. Leaving things plugged in or on standby when not in uses means the TV/microwave/whatver is still plugged in is still using 10 - 15% power, so ads significantly to the energy bill.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Limit my 12-year-old to a five-minute shower.

                          I have threatened to turn off the water from the hot-water heater if he goes beyond his allotted five minutes.

                          He has not so far.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            jeffou, in my dads house showers were and still are 3 mins. When the house was renovated a few years ago a switch to turn the water off was installed in the kitchen. He LOVED it. You got a know on the wall as a warning to hurry up, then he would switch it off.

                            It never happened to me but did to one of my sisters regularly. lol.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Keep the heat on during the summer and the ac on during the winter... (i.e. turn off your thermostat!)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X