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Seasonal Produce: What's In Now Where You Live? How Do You Use It?

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    Seasonal Produce: What's In Now Where You Live? How Do You Use It?

    I'm in Texas.
    This week's grocery store purchases included the following seasonal deals:

    Cantaloupe for 97-cents (probably a loss leader) --- It's a big one, from California. No preparation necessary other than scrubbing & slicing.

    Green beans (really fresh, tender, tasty looking Texas beans) for $0.98/lb. I bought a 1-1/4 lb bag. I'll blanch and chill them, then toss them in miso dressing.

    Green Onions for 36-cents a bunch. I bought 2 bunches. I use it on salads and in things like fried rice or scrambled eggs. I'm so glad the price has come down. A few years ago they were about twice the price, so I messed around with regrowing them in water glasses and even grew some from seed. Now that the price is down, I've gotten lazy and don't do that any more.

    What are the seasonal deals where you live? How do you prepare them?

    #2
    Out here in Oregon raspberries are in season. I took the family berry picking last weekend and got 2 lbs of apples and 2 lbs of raspberries for $8.99. It would have been closer to 11 or 12 bucks if we bought that fruit at a grocery store - AND we got some good exercise and a fun family outing.
    james.c.hendrickson@gmail.com
    202.468.6043

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      #3
      Originally posted by james.hendrickson View Post
      Out here in Oregon raspberries are in season. I took the family berry picking last weekend and got 2 lbs of apples and 2 lbs of raspberries for $8.99. It would have been closer to 11 or 12 bucks if we bought that fruit at a grocery store - AND we got some good exercise and a fun family outing.
      AND they were as fresh as it gets.
      That sounds great, James. What a fun family outing.

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        #4
        This week's deals were small Southern peaches for 77-cents a lb, red bell peppers for 98-cents each, 6 oz clamshell of blackberries for $1.88, and green onions for 36-cents a bunch.

        I also got a big bunch of organic basil and a pint of mixed mini-tomatoes at the farmer's market for $3 each. Those weren't cheap, but were competitive with regular super market prices and they were super-fresh.

        Yesterday I made Pesto Garden Pasta with homemade almond butter pesto (recipes found in "The Minimalist Kitchen" by Melissa Coleman who also blogs as "The Faux Martha"). I substituted green onions instead of red, and used veggie pasta.

        Isn't the idea of making pesto with almond butter brilliant? I think so - wish I had thought of it! I've not made homemade pesto before because I've been put off by the idea of buying a bag of expensive pine nuts when I only need a little bit. But I almost always have almond butter on hand.

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          #5
          I'm starting to see corn, peppers, and tomatoes at the local farm market.

          On a side note, I've been picking black raspberries the past couple weeks. Black berries are coming in now. I was out in the woods yesterday, and it looks like they will be ready to pick in a few days.

          I'm starting to get banana and green bell peppers in my garden as well.
          Brian

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            #6
            We have peppers and tomatoes in our garden as well - we aren't the most frugal, but gardening is a good inexpensive family activity.
            james.c.hendrickson@gmail.com
            202.468.6043

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              #7
              Zucchini is in season in Texas right now. Today I'm going to make "Simple Zucchini Soup" from the cookbook "100 Days of Real Food on a Budget" (that I checked out from the local library).

              Over the weekend I made "Okra Oven Fries" (okra quartered length-wise, seasoned with olive oil, salt, pepper, a bit of spice, and roasted in the oven). I don't know if it's okra season or not, but the okra looked nice & fresh, not too expensive, and the recipe was easy. I got the idea to try this from another library cookbook, "Deep Run Roots" by Vivian Howard. You may have seen her TV show "A Chef's Life" on PBS. But I digress ... I love roasted root vegetables. I would not have thought to try roasting fresh okra had I not read the recipe and the author's description of how tasty they are when cooked this way.

              I'm not a gourmet chef, so sticking with easy recipes is essential to keep me on the budget-and-health-conscious path.
              Last edited by scfr; 10-08-2018, 10:30 AM.

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