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Does couponing really save money?

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    Does couponing really save money?

    I have never been one to get into couponing since the coupons that I find never seem to be for things that I would normally buy. There seem to be a lot of people who use coupons to save money. Is there a trick to this? Is it worth the time and effort to learn about coupons to save money for this challenge?

    #2
    Yes, it's worth it. The real savings from couponing, however, doesn't come from the coupons (at least in the shows that you see on TV). It comes from changing the way you purchase food and make your meals. The "extreme couponers" only buy the food that is the best deal each week regardless of what they are planning to make for meals that week. They then plan their meals from what they have on hand (rather than the way most people do it -- decide what they want and then buy the ingredients for it). By creating meals from what you have on hand rather than buying the ingredients for meals you want, you can reduce your grocery shopping by 50% or more. After doing this, coupons are simply icing on the cake.

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      #3
      I think the answer is "it depends."

      Coupons are typically for brand name products, national brands, and frequently new products to entice you to try them. You need to do your homework and still compare the cost to other brands and generics. If you have a 50-cent coupon for Kellogg's Frosted Flakes but they cost $4/box and store brand is $2/box, even with the coupon, you are still overspending, even with double coupons.
      Steve

      * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
      * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
      * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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        #4
        Yes, it does. Provided you use the coupons for things you were going to purchase any way. It also helps, like Jeffery pointed out, if you are stockpiling foods when they are on sale rather than just buying week to week.

        There are lots of great, FREE sites that help you with getting started. I'm in North Georgia, so one I love is Southern Savers. Jill Cataldo's site covers the Chicago area. The Grocery Game is pretty much nationwide, but it's a paid site.

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          #5
          Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
          If you have a 50-cent coupon for Kellogg's Frosted Flakes but they cost $4/box and store brand is $2/box, even with the coupon, you are still overspending, even with double coupons.
          If you are going to buy the name brand, then you are saving with a coupon. I only buy certain store brands depending on taste, so coupons come in handy for the name brands I do buy.

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            #6
            I don't think it does. At the end he costing get equal in my calculation. But some times it does a little difference.

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              #7
              I never seem to buy anything that requires a coupon except for Yoplait Yogurt. So I tend to only save 50 cents on those 6 or 8 I buy. I think if you tend to buy a lot of processed food or national brands then coupons could make a different. We don't eat a lot of that kind of food so coupons don't save us a lot. But if I can use one I do.

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                #8
                I recently saw a lady save close to $10 by using coupons and started considering using them as well. Every pennny saved counts these days. My problem, like others, is that I can never really find coupons for the stuff I buy.

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