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Old 05-18-2017, 02:08 PM
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Default how much are you earning?

Just curious .. anyone actually earning any money from the internet?
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Old 05-18-2017, 02:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Poppasmurf View Post
Just curious .. anyone actually earning any money from the internet?
Depends on what you call the internet.

For my vacation rental management company, almost all of our reservations are through the internet, which adds up to over $1 million a year. Of course that isn't my earnings (I wish!)
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Old 05-18-2017, 02:27 PM
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Depends on what you call the internet.
That's a really interesting point. So much of everything we do today is somehow tied into the internet. Even folks with traditional jobs for bricks and mortar companies may telecommute online. I'm a physician but our electronic health records and nearly all of our prescribing happens online.

As far as straight online business, I make about $10,000/year doing professional surveys and a few hundred more selling stuff on ebay/craigslist/half.com.
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Old 05-18-2017, 03:30 PM
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About 80 dollars a year via youtube..lol

Posted those videos 3 years ago due to a hobby of mine..they are still making money very slowly.
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Old 05-18-2017, 04:18 PM
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About 80 dollars a year via youtube..lol

Posted those videos 3 years ago due to a hobby of mine..they are still making money very slowly.


That's cool, any pointers how to get an income from YouTube? I've posted 2 videos
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Old 05-18-2017, 05:21 PM
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That's a really interesting point. So much of everything we do today is somehow tied into the internet. Even folks with traditional jobs for bricks and mortar companies may telecommute online. I'm a physician but our electronic health records and nearly all of our prescribing happens online.

As far as straight online business, I make about $10,000/year doing professional surveys and a few hundred more selling stuff on ebay/craigslist/half.com.
Online physician consults are getting to be big deal too.
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Old 05-18-2017, 05:27 PM
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Online physician consults are getting to be big deal too.
True. I signed up with one of the big companies in this sector (HealthTap) but I never actually did any work for them. As a doctor, I have to say the whole concept is rather uncomfortable. Diagnosing and treating patients purely by video chat kind of goes against everything we are taught in medical school. I'm not sure how well it works in real life.
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Old 05-18-2017, 06:47 PM
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totally unfamiliar in that area, but I'd be very uncomfortable doing it. My chief worry would be misdiagnosing someone, then getting slapped with a malpractice suit when they claim that somehow I should have known their fatigue (or whatever) was due to cancer, and not a common cold. or their "cold" was actually bronchitis. Or their chest hurts because they have an irregular heart beat. lame examples I know. At least if you see them in person, you have a greater chance of diagnosing them correctly or identifying if there's an issue where they need to go in for more testing.
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Old 05-18-2017, 07:31 PM
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That's cool, any pointers how to get an income from YouTube? I've posted 2 videos
You have to be consistent in your postings and make high quality content. Good lighting, good production value, and stick to an interesting topic you are passionate about.

It's a lot of hard work to be honest (talking in front of a camera is easy, but the editing just kills me..spending 10+ hours on a video).

Also if you make good adult related content(say finance vs reviewing fisher price toys), you earn more per ad due to your audience being high value ad targets.
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Old 05-19-2017, 05:20 AM
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Diagnosing and treating patients purely by video chat kind of goes against everything we are taught in medical school. I'm not sure how well it works in real life.
I dont think it would be such a stretch to eventually see a doctor through video chat. Why would that be any different than if someone was in the room?

I dont know if any doctor would diagnose a patient without doing some sort of test. Listening to their heart/breathing isnt anything special...that could be done remote. Temperature, viewing throat, ears, eyes...blood work, blood pressure..all remote. X rays, whatever other tests, etc etc.

Im trying to think of my last few visits which are few and far between...they could have easily had the physician assistant or nurse (whatever you call them) be in the room by themselves. If a doctor was on a video screen he could have easily walked that person through what I was there for.

More than likely though in the future we'll see something where a patient sits or lays in a chair that has all kinds of gadgets attached to it that can check vitals and every other thing imaginable...or some sort of scanning device that can give all that info in a few seconds.
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Old 05-19-2017, 06:27 AM
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I dont think it would be such a stretch to eventually see a doctor through video chat. Why would that be any different than if someone was in the room?
The doctor in the room can do a physical exam.
The doctor on the video chat can't.

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I dont know if any doctor would diagnose a patient without doing some sort of test.
That's exactly how telemedicine is working, though. You call in or video chat, talk to the doctor, he/she then tells you what to do and, if appropriate, prescribes medication.

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More than likely though in the future we'll see something where a patient sits or lays in a chair that has all kinds of gadgets attached to it that can check vitals and every other thing imaginable...or some sort of scanning device that can give all that info in a few seconds.
There is actually a system that already does this to an extent. There is a free-standing booth, like in a pharmacy, where you step in and do the video chat. If the doctor wants to see in your ear, a panel opens and an otoscope is there. You hold it in your own ear and the doctor can see the image. It doesn't replace a normal physical exam but at least it's better than nothing.

Of course, doctors have been practicing telemedicine for decades. I do it every day in my office when a patient calls in with symptoms and I call in treatment for them. No exam occurs. The difference in those cases is that I know the patients, I know their history, what meds they're on, and they're personalities. Are they frequent complainers, calling with every sniffle and ache? Or are they really stoic and the fact that they're calling with this complaint raises a red flag that something potentially serious is going on? And if I'm just not sure, I can tell them to come over for me to see them in person. The doctor on the other end of the video chat can't do that. I mean she can say, "Go see your doctor" but I'm sure a lot of people who gravitate toward these services are folks who don't have established relationships with a family doctor.

After 24 years in practice, I just know how important it is to actually see and observe and examine and speak to the patient face to face. You can pick up on a lot of clues that wouldn't come across in a Skype conversation. And sometimes key info comes from someone else in the exam room - a parent or spouse or child of the patient. If I only spoke to and saw the patient, I'd miss all of that.

It's an interesting development. I'm curious to see how it progresses.
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Old 05-19-2017, 11:11 AM
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Telemedicine eh, got to wonder how long it will be before you start seeing ads popping up?
something like ... ears plugged, buy your cotton swabs here!
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Old 05-19-2017, 11:20 AM
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Originally Posted by disneysteve View Post
The doctor in the room can do a physical exam.
The doctor on the video chat can't.


That's exactly how telemedicine is working, though. You call in or video chat, talk to the doctor, he/she then tells you what to do and, if appropriate, prescribes medication.


There is actually a system that already does this to an extent. There is a free-standing booth, like in a pharmacy, where you step in and do the video chat. If the doctor wants to see in your ear, a panel opens and an otoscope is there. You hold it in your own ear and the doctor can see the image. It doesn't replace a normal physical exam but at least it's better than nothing.

Of course, doctors have been practicing telemedicine for decades. I do it every day in my office when a patient calls in with symptoms and I call in treatment for them. No exam occurs. The difference in those cases is that I know the patients, I know their history, what meds they're on, and they're personalities. Are they frequent complainers, calling with every sniffle and ache? Or are they really stoic and the fact that they're calling with this complaint raises a red flag that something potentially serious is going on? And if I'm just not sure, I can tell them to come over for me to see them in person. The doctor on the other end of the video chat can't do that. I mean she can say, "Go see your doctor" but I'm sure a lot of people who gravitate toward these services are folks who don't have established relationships with a family doctor.

After 24 years in practice, I just know how important it is to actually see and observe and examine and speak to the patient face to face. You can pick up on a lot of clues that wouldn't come across in a Skype conversation. And sometimes key info comes from someone else in the exam room - a parent or spouse or child of the patient. If I only spoke to and saw the patient, I'd miss all of that.

It's an interesting development. I'm curious to see how it progresses.
with the skyrocketing cost of medical insurance and the pressure to lower the costs, I'm guessing it may expand by necessity, rather than choice.

And regarding telemedicine, once you're using the internet, the traditional limits such as location go out the window. You open the door to these services being outsourced to india and other 3rd world countries, much like other professional industries. They get "certified" to practice by US standards, but willing to accept pay far less than US professionals. Only when your injury or condition is deemed bad enough are you referred to a real family practitioner here in the US.

Once the internet is involved, you can pretty much attempt to outsource anything. I knew fast food locations that outsourced their drivethru function to india and the Philippines. They eventually switched back to at-location drivethru cashiers because the service was pretty bad, and complaints probably went through the roof. Pretty much I would have to say or do anything to get past the drive thru speaker, then place the "real" order at the payment window.

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Old 05-19-2017, 01:16 PM
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And regarding telemedicine, once you're using the internet, the traditional limits such as location go out the window. You open the door to these services being outsourced to india and other 3rd world countries, much like other professional industries.
Well that can only happen if every state changes their laws. I suppose that could happen but I think it's somewhat unlikely. As the law stands now, you must be licensed in the state to provide medical services there. Even if I started doing telemedicine, I could only do it for patients in my state.
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Old 05-19-2017, 04:24 PM
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I dont think it would be such a stretch to eventually see a doctor through video chat. Why would that be any different than if someone was in the room?

I dont know if any doctor would diagnose a patient without doing some sort of test. Listening to their heart/breathing isnt anything special...that could be done remote. Temperature, viewing throat, ears, eyes...blood work, blood pressure..all remote. X rays, whatever other tests, etc etc.

Im trying to think of my last few visits which are few and far between...they could have easily had the physician assistant or nurse (whatever you call them) be in the room by themselves. If a doctor was on a video screen he could have easily walked that person through what I was there for.

More than likely though in the future we'll see something where a patient sits or lays in a chair that has all kinds of gadgets attached to it that can check vitals and every other thing imaginable...or some sort of scanning device that can give all that info in a few seconds.

You make medicine sound so simple that anyone with two legs could do it. When working I was an RN. I remember many times after doing my mini 'physicals' on my patients at the beginning of the shift and coming back to chart what I found. I would also see what other nurses and the docs had charted. I found it interesting that many times I was charting things like heart murmurs, the bruits & thrills on a dialysis site, etc. Did the nurses not notice? Did they not check? Did they not care? I don't really know. I was glad to see that when I heard a murmur the doc did as well! So your saying anybody can do it, you'd better be hoping you got a nurse that graduated near the top of the class instead of the bottom. I can't imagine doing all those things needed by remote or in a booth. So many things can be missed by not paying attention to the right things. I give you the prime example of the lady we had that people decided she had scabies and were trying to treat her for that. I came in looked around her room and discovered the woman was into snuff and had it all over herself and her bed. I don't suppose you would see that over video.
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Old 05-19-2017, 04:28 PM
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As to the opening post of this thread, I do make income on line from my sewing and craft store as well as small amounts from Google AdSense. I would prefer not to say how much I make, but I can say it is way down from what it used to be unfortunately. So I have some other thoughts on things to do. I just run out of time and energy to boost my business the way I would like to.
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Old 05-19-2017, 05:32 PM
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You make medicine sound so simple that anyone with two legs could do it. When working I was an RN. I remember many times after doing my mini 'physicals' on my patients at the beginning of the shift and coming back to chart what I found. I would also see what other nurses and the docs had charted. I found it interesting that many times I was charting things like heart murmurs, the bruits & thrills on a dialysis site, etc. Did the nurses not notice? Did they not check? Did they not care? I don't really know. I was glad to see that when I heard a murmur the doc did as well! So your saying anybody can do it, you'd better be hoping you got a nurse that graduated near the top of the class instead of the bottom. I can't imagine doing all those things needed by remote or in a booth. So many things can be missed by not paying attention to the right things. I give you the prime example of the lady we had that people decided she had scabies and were trying to treat her for that. I came in looked around her room and discovered the woman was into snuff and had it all over herself and her bed. I don't suppose you would see that over video.
I think due to the spiraling cost of healthcare, more of these changes are going to come down the pipeline though. Video/phone conferencing with hospital staff may eventually become the norm rather than the exception. When I was a kid, and had a skin condition, I could simply go see a dermatologist. Nowadays, they run me through a gen practitioner, and if he deems it necessary, I can see the dermatologist. Everything the companies do is in the name of saving money and containing costs. More and more nowadays nurses are taking responsibilities once handled by doctors. In some hospitals/clincs, you won't even see a gen practictioner unless the nurse determines the issue is serious enough for you to see one.

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Old 05-19-2017, 05:47 PM
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I think due to the spiraling cost of healthcare, more of these changes are going to come down the pipeline though. Video/phone conferencing with hospital staff may eventually become the norm rather than the exception. When I was a kid, and had a skin condition, I could simply go see a dermatologist. Nowadays, they run me through a gen practitioner, and if he deems it necessary, I can see the dermatologist. Everything the companies do is in the name of saving money and containing costs. More and more nowadays nurses are taking responsibilities once handled by doctors. In some hospitals/clincs, you won't even see a gen practictioner unless the nurse determines the issue is serious enough for you to see one.
A few comments on this:

1. "Everything the companies do is in the name of saving money and containing costs." That's how they spin it but the reality is just the opposite many times. Let's say you injure your knee and come to see me. I want to order an MRI, but no, the insurance company won't allow that. First I need to send you for an x-ray. Then I need to send you for 4 weeks of physical therapy. Only then might they allow the MRI. If they still deny it, I then have to send you to see an Orthopedist and they order the MRI. So if they would have approved my initial request, they would have just paid for the MRI and one visit with me. Instead, they end up paying for at least 2 visits in my office, an x-ray, 4 weeks of PT, one or more visits to the Ortho, and still paying for the MRI anyway. Where exactly did that save money?

2. Dermatology is actually one place where telemedicine makes a lot of sense. The "exam" in many derm cases is 99% visual observation. That's something that could be effectively done via camera. When I was in training, I worked with one dermatologist who was an old, morbidly obese guy. He would literally sit in a chair and patients would come in to the exam room one by one. He never touched them. He just asked some questions, took a look at their skin, and treated them. That could easily be done remotely.

3. It is true that advance practice nurses (nurse practitioners and physician assistants) are doing many tasks formerly done only by physicians. That's really been driven by two factors: cost cutting (NPs and PAs work for less than MDs and DOs) and the growing shortage of physicians, especially in primary care. Where I work in urgent care, we have both physicians and APNs on staff and we work side by side with each other. I have absolutely no problem with that. We can't hire either doctors or NPs/PAs fast enough to keep up with our demand.
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Old 05-19-2017, 08:05 PM
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You make medicine sound so simple that anyone with two legs could do it. When working I was an RN. I remember many times after doing my mini 'physicals' on my patients at the beginning of the shift and coming back to chart what I found. I would also see what other nurses and the docs had charted. I found it interesting that many times I was charting things like heart murmurs, the bruits & thrills on a dialysis site, etc. Did the nurses not notice? Did they not check? Did they not care? I don't really know. I was glad to see that when I heard a murmur the doc did as well! So your saying anybody can do it, you'd better be hoping you got a nurse that graduated near the top of the class instead of the bottom. I can't imagine doing all those things needed by remote or in a booth. So many things can be missed by not paying attention to the right things. I give you the prime example of the lady we had that people decided she had scabies and were trying to treat her for that. I came in looked around her room and discovered the woman was into snuff and had it all over herself and her bed. I don't suppose you would see that over video.
You just made some great arguments with the flaws in doctors/nurses. How did you chart the heart murmurs? Do you have some magical ability like xray vision? My guess is they were being monitored by some sort of machine? Why isnt there something in place like a computer program to record/spit out that data instead of relying on someone to manually read them? If there is something abnormal with the heart beat couldnt an error display on the screen stating such?

The problem with doing something a certain way for so long is that you cant possibly see another way of doing that very thing. The old saying "if its not broke dont fix it." Modern medicine is so new. No one can wrap their heads around what its going to be like 100 years from now let alone 500 years from now assuming we dont blow ourselves up or an asteroid doesnt hit us.

For thousands of years people had to use horses for transportation. The first car was invented in the late 1800's. Then came the first flight in 1903...59 years later we sent people to the moon in a metal tube. Now you can travel around the world in less than a day in a cylinder with wings. Is it really such a stretch to think a patient couldnt be hooked up to a device and a doctor monitor them from across the globe?
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Old 05-19-2017, 09:53 PM
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You just made some great arguments with the flaws in doctors/nurses. How did you chart the heart murmurs? Do you have some magical ability like xray vision? My guess is they were being monitored by some sort of machine? Why isnt there something in place like a computer program to record/spit out that data instead of relying on someone to manually read them? If there is something abnormal with the heart beat couldnt an error display on the screen stating such?
I think your problem is that you don't know or understand medical things. How did I chart the heart murmurs when I noted them? With my own hand in pen on paper although now it would be on a computer. It doesn't take any magical xray vision to hear a murmur because you can basically only see it on an echocardiogram, a specialized test that is not done at all via a video conference. A trained nurse can HEAR it via her stethoscope. If she notes that the doctor hasn't noted it, she brings it to her charge nurse's notice to let the doctor know, or if you are the charge nurse like I usually was, I would be sure that the doctor was aware. Some murmurs are not problematic others can be, so you don't blow off something like this. Not every patient in a hospital is being monitored for what their heart is doing - that would be horrifically expensive. I was in the hospital ER myself about a month ago after a bad fall and what I could see of the cardiac monitor it wasn't showing MY murmur. DisneySteve would be more aware of that, but I don't think the machines are set up for that. Many people have heart murmurs. If a new one is found it is generally through the sharp ears of a nurse or doctor, PA, RNP. The same can be said for an aortic aneurysm, and other interesting things that a nurse on the ball finds and works with the doctor to be sure that the best care is being offered to the patient. It is vitally important for a doctor or nurse to be hands on with a patient, even if it is a visiting nurse that has done the physical assessment part of a video conference. Something as simple as noting the patients skin color, if the whites of the eyes are yellow, things like that which can be distorted by the camera and lighting conditions. Sometimes even the smell a patient is giving off helps to diagnose a patient. Like Emeril used to say there is no smellavision. It would take, I believe nurses with specialized training and great powers of observation to make this work and if I was the doctor I would want to know them personally in a professional capacity and so would be able to judge for themselves whether the nurse was competent enough for the extra things she/he has to observe and report.
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