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  • 9 Post By disneysteve
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Old 08-07-2017, 07:03 PM
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Default Portfolio balance over 25 years

We often talk about how much we have, how much we want to have, how much we think we ought to have, and so on. We wonder how market conditions will impact our investments, if we'll have enough for college and for retirement. We encourage each other to keep saving and keep investing and let compound interest work its magic.

I've been tracking our portfolio value since we barely had enough money to even use the term portfolio to describe it. I thought it would be neat to post those numbers to illustrate how things grow over time, how corrections happen, life happens, and who knows what else, but in the long run, the money grows and grows and grows if you keep at it. I'm missing 2 figures on the list but that doesn't detract from the point. All but the current year figures are from year end. I'm not posting to brag or boast but to put real numbers to the discussions we have every day. We often talk in averages and percentages but I think looking at actual figures really drives home how slow and steady really does work over the long haul.

1992: $8,195
1993: $24,990 (finished residency and started working)
1994: $32,502 (bought our house)
1995: $59,749 (had our daughter)
1996: $67,615
1997: $87,663
1999: $152,896
2000: $136,426 (out of work for 3 months then took job at lower salary)
2002: $136,270
2003: $211,060
2004: $238,398
2005: $288,301
2006: $361,085
2007: $393,595
2008: $280,208 (market crash)
2009: $395,673 (back to pre-crash level)
2010: $470,000
2011: $491,085
2012: $578,177
2013: $712,968
2014: $782,581
2015: $777,444
2016: $837,202
July 2017: $930,659

In 25 years, we've gone from 4 figures to closing in on 7 figures. Slow and steady. Just keep at it. Keep putting away what you can and watch it grow.
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Old 08-08-2017, 03:54 AM
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I track this too, although I must not have started right away. I do know we had $25K in 2003, and as of the end of July 2017 we have $451K. Fourteen years of savings add up!
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Old 08-08-2017, 06:53 AM
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Nice.

It's nice to see it all written down this way.

I'm currently working on an article for the site. I might be able to create a link to this thread as a representation of what is possible with steady and vigilante saving and investing over time.
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Old 08-08-2017, 07:18 AM
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I started my 403b at around the same time as DS. Thank goodness for the bull market then, because I only made between $10 and $12 per hour the whole time. When I quit 18 years ago, I had about $50,000 in the account and haven't added a penny since. My portfolio lost over 20% after 9/11, and I didn't even look during the 2008 crash. I have just short of $90,000 today which isn't bad. I have it 100% in stocks but it is well diversified and only a little risky. Our main retirement account is more conservative.
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Old 08-08-2017, 07:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msomnipotent View Post
My portfolio lost over 20% after 9/11
I wasn't even thinking of this. Just another thing that shows that over time, all of those things are just blips if you hang on and don't panic.

I'm missing my 2001 figure but you can see that our portfolio was flat from 2000 to 2002 as a result of that.
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Old 08-08-2017, 09:01 AM
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Seeing the numbers on paper really puts things into prospective. You'll be a millionaire next year not including your house. You'll be able to pick and choose how many hours you want to work imo...especially if you relocate to FL where the amount you'll save in property taxes would cover your health insurance expense for a year!
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Old 08-08-2017, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rennigade View Post
Seeing the numbers on paper really puts things into prospective. You'll be a millionaire next year not including your house. You'll be able to pick and choose how many hours you want to work imo...especially if you relocate to FL where the amount you'll save in property taxes would cover your health insurance expense for a year!
Well I can't cut back work quite yet. We don't plan to be living on our portfolio for another 10 years roughly, so we still need to pay the bills and keep saving.

On the positive side, we will get a $30,000 "raise" next year when DD finishes college and those expenses go away, so even if I allow my income to drop, the net would still be the same.
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Old 08-08-2017, 04:40 PM
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Congratulations! What's your number steve? Do you know what you want to have to retire?
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Old 08-08-2017, 05:21 PM
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Quote:
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What's your number steve? Do you know what you want to have to retire?
I think $1.75-2 million is realistic if I can keep at it for about 10 more years.
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Old 08-09-2017, 05:43 AM
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Good job !
It's really pretty amazing how the money piles up with compounding after you have a couple hundred thousand stashed.
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Old 08-09-2017, 05:47 AM
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Amazing to see. I am curious to know what your portfolio consists of? Roth IRA, ? Traditional IRA? 401K? Additional taxable brokerage investments (ETFs? Mutual Funds? Bonds)?
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Old 08-09-2017, 05:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fishindude77 View Post
It's really pretty amazing how the money piles up with compounding after you have a couple hundred thousand stashed.
Definitely. The bulk of growth year to year is internal from investment returns, not from new money going in.
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Old 08-09-2017, 06:01 AM
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I am curious to know what your portfolio consists of? Roth IRA, ? Traditional IRA? 401K? Additional taxable brokerage investments (ETFs? Mutual Funds? Bonds)?
All of the above (well no ETFs). We both have Roths. My wife has a 401k and 403b from prior jobs. I have a Roth and a current 401k. We have some taxable mutual funds, individual stocks, some I bonds, and general savings.
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