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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 06-11-2016, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by TexasHusker View Post
My undergrad was a BA in English. Three weeks later, I was working in a hospital marketing department.

Six months later, I was the general manager of a hotel.
My undergrad was in Computer Science. I was guilted into working for the family business, but a year later was a computer programmer. Been one ever since.

I did take a Junior level English class on Shakespeare, though, as an elective instead of an easier 100 or 200 level course, because I thought it was Good For Me.
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Old 06-11-2016, 08:55 PM
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My best friend got a 1510/1600 on his SAT, barely did any homework in college nor did he go to classes much. Ended up with a 3.6 gpa, a 32 on his MCat without studying, and a 99% on the Pcat without cracking open a book. He was specifically trained in critical thinking in Canada since elementary school (their gifted program). We went to IB together and I'm sure that helped in HS as well.

He perhaps is the best critical thinker I know since I met him in 9th grade. I honestly think I didn't learn a thing from college besides how to socialize. I just needed the grades for Pharm school. My critical thinking skills, like my friend..didn't improve one bit from going to classes.

I also know many coworkers with a Pharm D degree who can't think outside of a box if a gun was pointed at them. When a small problem arise that is foreign to them, they make a gigantic deal out of it and just literally freeze..because they don't know what to do..and this is with 6-8 years of higher education. I believe either you learned it young, or don't have it at all..like speaking a 2nd language without an accent...

Last edited by Singuy; 06-11-2016 at 09:01 PM.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 06-11-2016, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Singuy View Post
We went to IB together and I'm sure that helped in HS as well.
IB?

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My critical thinking skills, like my friend..didn't improve one bit from going to classes.
Hopefully it exposed you to new ideas...

Quote:
I also know many coworkers with a Pharm D degree who can't think outside of a box if a gun was pointed at them. When a small problem arise that is foreign to them, they make a gigantic deal out of it and just literally freeze..because they don't know what to do..and this is with 6-8 years of higher education.
This is because college is now vo-tech.

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I believe either you learned it young, or don't have it at all..like speaking a 2nd language without an accent...
Or were born with it.
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Old 06-11-2016, 09:15 PM
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IB: international baccalaureate magnet program

Basically it's 2 years of pre-IB and 2 years of IB in HS. After 4 years of advanced learning and taking this massive board..we each get an IB diploma which gave us 28 college credit hours and 100% state tuition coverage x 4 years.
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Old 06-12-2016, 04:58 AM
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The article which I referenced above offered a survey of unemployment rates for college graduates (which the majority of folks got wrong).

Unemployment rates were 2.4% for folks with a college degree.

From the article:
"There is some evidence that having a college degree doesnít guarantee a good job, but the alternative is much worse. Young people who have earned a college degree have substantially lower unemployment rates than those who havenít. Since 2000, young college graduates, on average, have an unemployment rate that is 5.5 percentage points lower than those of nongraduates. And this gap typically widens during recessions; it expanded to 10 percentage points at the depths of the Great Recession."
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...quiz.html?_r=1

The article also noted that "A typical college graduate can expect to make over half a million dollars more than a nongraduate over a lifetime."
(I actually seen the estimate to be higher in the past).
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Old 06-12-2016, 07:53 AM
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Two weeks after I graduated, I was working at Arby's. Rose to be an asst. manager making a nickle an hour more than the other 'girls' for the next year. And I fully supported myself on the wages I got there and actually saved up money so when I had a job interview near NYC I had the money fly out and back!
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Old 06-12-2016, 10:31 AM
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Did you get the job???
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2016, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Gailete View Post
Two weeks after I graduated, I was working at Arby's. Rose to be an asst. manager making a nickle an hour more than the other 'girls' for the next year. And I fully supported myself on the wages I got there and actually saved up money so when I had a job interview near NYC I had the money fly out and back!
I presume spelling wasn't a part of your college curriculum.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2016, 04:50 PM
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I presume spelling wasn't a part of your college curriculum.
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Old 06-13-2016, 11:00 AM
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Liberal is student loans? Conservative is paying them back? I've found that both liberal and conservatives don't pay back loans and both borrow. I've also found that both liberals and conservatives walk away from homes in foreclosures. I don't think that financial awareness is a liberal/conservative thing.
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 02:31 PM
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I presume spelling wasn't a part of your college curriculum.
Spelling has always been tough for me as I am dyslexic. I find great joy in the fact that I can read more and faster than most people. I may not be able to spell the words I see but I know what they mean and I understand them.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 02:33 PM
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Did you get the job???
Actually not the first one I applied for but someone else heard about me and had me come out again and I got that job. Clerk Typist at a college for $5K/year! Still better than Arby's.
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 02:58 PM
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I was just having a similar conversation this morning that sadly got cut off when the nurse called me in for my appointment: self-discipline -- not having children before you're married, etc -- vs. getting comfortable on the government dole, and not marrying because then the woman would lose all her benefits.



It surely is a left-wing uber-compassionate money-grows-on-trees-and-the-1% the world owes me a life mentality, which you certainly wouldn't have seen from Richard "my wife wears a respectable Republican cloth coat" Nixon, but would see in hippy-dippy Bernie Sanders supporters.

But in 2016, how many Republican women go to mega-churches in a respectable cloth coat?
Don't we want higher education to be possible for ALL, even those without the means (read: family) to pay for their educations up front?

Getting into debt up past your eyebrows for an education is a CHOICE, not a foregone conclusion. Perhaps a better policy (than not having student loans available at all) is to limit how much may be borrowed.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 04:12 PM
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Don't we want higher education to be possible for ALL, even those without the means (read: family) to pay for their educations up front?
Higher education is possible for all now. With community colleges, state schools, work-study programs, etc. Someone who has the academic ability can find an affordable way to get a degree.
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Old 06-13-2016, 04:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Gailete View Post
Spelling has always been tough for me as I am dyslexic. I find great joy in the fact that I can read more and faster than most people. I may not be able to spell the words I see but I know what they mean and I understand them.
I was just giving you a hard time. I couldn't resist.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 04:42 PM
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Higher education is possible for all now. With community colleges, state schools, work-study programs, etc. Someone who has the academic ability can find an affordable way to get a degree.
There are pluses and minuses to that.

We have four major high schools in our town. Two of them are considered middle/upper middle income. The other two are lower income. If a student graduates from the lower income schools with a certain grade point average (and it's not that high), they get their full tuition paid for at two local colleges/universities. That's really neat, except I have to foot the bill for my kid's tuition since we are upper middle income. That seems rather discriminatory to me, given the fact that I am already paying ENORMOUS local property taxes to support our community college, and to a lessor extent, our state universities.

Additionally, there is such an emphasis on attending college, that high schools often never think encourage kids to learn a trade - plumbing, electrical, welding, sheet metal, carpentry, cosmetology, etc. Almost as if it is frowned upon to do anything but go to college. That is a disgrace.

There a lot of tradespeople that love their work and are able to support a family and do just fine.

We need to rethink this idea that college is some sort of panacea with a big pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. It's not a fit for everyone.
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Last edited by TexasHusker; 06-13-2016 at 05:16 PM.
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 06:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Don't we want higher education to be possible for ALL, even those without the means (read: family) to pay for their educations up front?

Getting into debt up past your eyebrows for an education is a CHOICE, not a foregone conclusion. Perhaps a better policy (than not having student loans available at all) is to limit how much may be borrowed.
A better policy would be to limit how much college administators can spend on replacing functional but plain dormitories with fur-lined suites and solid gold private bathrooms.

SET MODE=RANT

How the hell did I survive for two years on a thin mattress over a metal frame in a room the size of a prison cell, having to use large communal showers and sinks and lavatories?

(My father stayed in the same dorm as me, but when it was first built, so no "the previous generation had it worse than you" ripostes allowed.)

SET MODE=NORANT
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 09:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Don't we want higher education to be possible for ALL, even those without the means (read: family) to pay for their educations up front?

Getting into debt up past your eyebrows for an education is a CHOICE, not a foregone conclusion. Perhaps a better policy (than not having student loans available at all) is to limit how much may be borrowed.
I personally don't want higher education for all. I think peoples intentions are in the right place wanting everyone to go to college and succeed but the reality is many people do not possess the aptitude or higher level critical thinking skills required to be successful in a college environment. Do I want someone who does possess these traits to get into college even though they are disadvantaged? Of course, but they likely are going to qualify for income based assistance and scholarship opportunities.

For those who aren't college material I'm not suggesting that they just stop their learning or training after securing a HS diploma or GED. There are other opportunities out there to get the requisite training for honest, decent paying vocations/trades. College is not for everyone and that is okay.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2016, 09:44 PM
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Originally Posted by TexasHusker View Post
There are pluses and minuses to that.

We have four major high schools in our town. Two of them are considered middle/upper middle income. The other two are lower income. If a student graduates from the lower income schools with a certain grade point average (and it's not that high), they get their full tuition paid for at two local colleges/universities. That's really neat, except I have to foot the bill for my kid's tuition since we are upper middle income. That seems rather discriminatory to me, given the fact that I am already paying ENORMOUS local property taxes to support our community college, and to a lessor extent, our state universities.

Additionally, there is such an emphasis on attending college, that high schools often never think encourage kids to learn a trade - plumbing, electrical, welding, sheet metal, carpentry, cosmetology, etc. Almost as if it is frowned upon to do anything but go to college. That is a disgrace.

There a lot of tradespeople that love their work and are able to support a family and do just fine.

We need to rethink this idea that college is some sort of panacea with a big pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. It's not a fit for everyone
Couldn't agree more. What bothers me about many high school guidance counselors is that they only push trades and vocational schools to the kids that take Votech in HS. There are plenty of kids that take a college preparatory curriculum in HS that have less than stellar grades. How about actually guiding them to reconsider college as a first option? "Oh just start at a community college and get your grades up to transfer to a 4 year school" they might say. For some borderline students that may be decent advice but there are many others where its plain as day that they would be better suited in a non-traditional hands on learning environment.

I don't want to put all the blame on the guidance counselors because some of it has to do with the parents as well. God forbid a guidance counselor suggest an alternative path and the parents will be beating down the doors to scold the counselor for crushing their son/daughter's self esteem. Parents many times are the ones that foist college upon their unqualified kids simply out of ego and status. They don't want to be the one in their social circle whose kid is not attending college. Nevermind it takes their kid 6 years to graduate with some Mickey Mouse undergrad degree and the kid will end up as a barista at Starbucks anyway.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 06-14-2016, 05:27 AM
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A better policy would be to limit how much college administators can spend on replacing functional but plain dormitories with fur-lined suites and solid gold private bathrooms.

SET MODE=RANT

How the hell did I survive for two years on a thin mattress over a metal frame in a room the size of a prison cell, having to use large communal showers and sinks and lavatories?

(My father stayed in the same dorm as me, but when it was first built, so no "the previous generation had it worse than you" ripostes allowed.)

SET MODE=NORANT
I went to the same college as my father had. At the time my parents had three of us and before they left there were 4 of us. They lived in 2 rooms, no kitchen, but they did as I did. If you set your cold food in the windowsill it was as good as a fridge during most of the college terms. I lived in the one and only girls dorm that was available. Shared with another girl. Other than our desk chairs everything was built in. My college had an enormous building program while I was there and in 4 years the student body also doubled. I then got to live in the new dorms when built. But still no one had stereos, TVs, coffee maker's, microwaves, fridges, etc. Some girls had electric kettles and popcorn makers. But we lived in the dorms and ate whatever the cafeteria made that day - no meal options whatsoever. The closest we got to choosing something different to eat was breakfast when we had a couple cereals to choose from.

VERY different than what kids get and expect these days. I saw the living room of a friends daughter before she went off to college, and my dorm room I doubt couldn't even have room for it all. Every year our local news does a news report on kids getting heading for college and how much it costs and I can understand why kids leave college with such high loans. They buy and take somewhere in the neighborhood of $1000 worth of new stuff to go with them. I took an old blanket, my quilt that I had just finished making (my first, started in 8th grade), a desk lamp, a teddy bear, a couple of towels and washclothes, and a portable typewriter and clothes. Came home with the same stuff plus a box of books.
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