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Understanding spousal SS benefits

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    #16
    Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

    I see how that gets us every possible penny. Thanks.

    Assuming we don’t care about squeezing every cent, could she claim her own benefit earlier than 70 and then switch to spousal benefit whenever I claim?
    I think so.

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      #17
      Originally posted by corn18 View Post
      Close enough. She should claim on her own benefits @ 70 exactly. You claim spousal benefits off her at the same time. Then when you turn 70, you claim your own benefits and she switches to spousal benefits. It's only 9 months, but it will get yo a bit extra.
      I may be wrong, but I am not sure you can do that due to the new "deemed filing" rules that went into place. With the deemed filing: "Deemed filing means that when you file for either your retirement or your spouse’s benefit, you are required or “deemed” to file for the other benefit as well. The Bipartisan Budget Act extends deemed filing rules to apply at full retirement age and beyond."
      https://www.ssa.gov/benefits/retirem.../claiming.html


      One interesting point made in a Kiplinger article is your spouse can file early on his/her own record and the deemed filing doesn't come into play if the worker has not yet filed (and the spouse can not yet file for a spousal benefit).
      Quote from the article, "To get around the deeming provision, the lower earner should apply for her retirement benefit before the higher earner applies for his. The Social Security Administration will not automatically switch her to the spousal benefit once she is eligible; the wife will have to file an application for the spousal benefit, Blair says."

      https://www.kiplinger.com/article/re...l-benefit.html

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        #18
        Originally posted by Like2Plan View Post
        One interesting point made in a Kiplinger article is your spouse can file early on his/her own record and the deemed filing doesn't come into play if the worker has not yet filed (and the spouse can not yet file for a spousal benefit).
        Quote from the article, "To get around the deeming provision, the lower earner should apply for her retirement benefit before the higher earner applies for his. The Social Security Administration will not automatically switch her to the spousal benefit once she is eligible; the wife will have to file an application for the spousal benefit, Blair says."
        That would be fine with me. She could get her benefit earlier and that would help delay the need for me to file (which I don't think will be necessary but it can't hurt).
        Steve

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          #19
          Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

          I see how that gets us every possible penny. Thanks.

          Assuming we don’t care about squeezing every cent, could she claim her own benefit earlier than 70 and then switch to spousal benefit whenever I claim?
          How does it get you every penny by her waiting until 70?
          LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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            #20
            But if you are comfortable in retirement does it make sense to take it before 70? I mean if you have more than enough and are doing taxable conversions of a 401k to a Roth then it probably should be no?
            LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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