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Do you budget for food supplements?

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  • QuarterMillionMan
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    NAcetylCysteine.jpg

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  • QuarterMillionMan
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    Sorry I didn’t see this sooner. When mixed with food it becomes jelly-like. I prefer not to let it gel and drink It fast. It helps move my bowels and digest well for me.

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  • ~bs
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    Originally posted by QuarterMillionMan View Post
    1 tsp with water daily. ChiaSeeds.jpg
    Just curious, why not mix that into food? Does it digest well raw on its own? Just curious.

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  • QuarterMillionMan
    replied
    1 tsp with water daily. ChiaSeeds.jpg

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  • ThatGirl1
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    We juice our vegetables and 3x a week I also take HYDROEYE which allows me to see much clearer during the day. I also juice kale, carrot & celery to keep my eye pain at bay and it helps my vision significantly

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  • ~bs
    replied
    i take a multivitamin, but that's it. I try to eat a well balanced diet with the major food groups in reasonable proportion to each other along with exercise. Taking a medley of supplements for the layperson probably isn't the best idea, and might cause more harm than good (or provide no benefit at all) unless approved by your doctor.

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  • Snicks
    replied
    I do not. Frankly I do not trust supplements. Many are not FDA approved and who knows where they come from? I would rather invest the money in a better quality diet.

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  • cypher1
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    Originally posted by bjl584 View Post
    I take a multi vitamin, whey protein, and a few sports supplements.
    I just lump them in with the grocery budget
    I'm in the same boat. Almost everything I get can be picked up at Costco, besides a pre-workout mix. So budgeting with groceries isn't a factor.

    Now for people spending 25-50% on supplements in comparison to their grocery list, I'd probably question if they're focusing too much on that magic pill vs diet.

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  • bjl584
    replied
    I take a multi vitamin, whey protein, and a few sports supplements.
    I just lump them in with the grocery budget

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  • disneysteve
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    Originally posted by myrdale View Post
    Some supplements are fat soluble, some water water soluble. You're body is going to expel what ever is in excess, especially of the water soluble.
    Just to clarify, yes, your body will get rid of the excess WATER soluble ones, like vitamin C. That's why a lot of people say supplements just give you really expensive urine.

    However, FAT soluble things build up in your system and can be toxic. Vitamins A, D, E, and K are among the fat soluble supplements. You can overdose on those and suffer ill effects if you take too much.

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  • myrdale
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    Originally posted by cypher1 View Post
    I just realized this thread is from 4 years ago.
    HA I didn't catch that myself.

    To the new OP Lakersgirl, welcome to the forums.

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  • myrdale
    replied
    There is an awful lot of miss information out there on supplements in general.

    First and foremost, you're not going to die of scurvy or rickets in today's society. You could go though life and never take a single pill and come out OK.

    Secondly supplements are not magic bullets (unless you have scurvy or rickets). They will help you reach you're goals but you still have to put in the work.

    Despite natural, balanced, healthy diets, I still like the idea of a good multivitamin.

    If you're looking at burning fat, CLA and L-Carnitine are suppose to be a good combo to take. But keep in mind, this is to burn fat, that means you are working out.

    I've had doctors who have pushed vitamin D supplements above and beyond what is in the multivitamin.

    I've got mixed fillings about Omega 3 fish oils. I eat a lot of tuna and salmon as is.

    Whey is good if you're building muscle.

    Creatine is pretty well misunderstood also. I thought this was some type of steroid that makes you go nuts. It's not. Your body produces it naturally. It's used in the ATP cycle your muscles use for energy. It will make you retain water also in your muscles. It may look nice but it's just water.

    I scoff at the vitamin C claims. A glass of cranberry juice here and there and you're good to go. Our body's inability to produce vitamin C is actually a strong argument for evolution.

    Probiotics are extremely important. There are studies of taking flora from a healthy individual and giving them to an obese one and it greatly affecting weight loss. Do you need a $150 bottle of refrigerated cultures, or can the occassional yogurt get you there (much less licking the back of your hand)?

    An occasional iron supplement doesn't hurt.

    Human growth hormone is bad.

    There is arguments over what is the ideal dose. Is 100% of the daily value good enough? Are there some that it is more optimum to exceed (or greatly exceed) that amount?

    Some supplements are fat soluble, some water water soluble. You're body is going to expel what ever is in excess, especially of the water soluble.

    I should imagine you could do liver or kidney damage by taking too much of certain things.

    The main point to most of my ? is I am not an expert and most of what I have read varies from source to source.

    Considering you can spend $150 a month easily in GNC, I would absolutely educate myself and figure out what my goals are, then come up with a plan and stick with it. And if it is much more than the occasional bottle of One A Day, I'd put it in the budget.

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  • james.hendrickson
    replied
    Originally posted by cypher1 View Post

    I just realized this thread is from 4 years ago. But back to the subject, I agree a healthy diet for nutrition and lifestyle are the core essentials for overall well-being. As with sleep, and regular exercise behind it. But supplements can also contribute or compliment for healthy habits. In no way am I saying they should be the primary focus in well-being, without focus on nutrition and lifestyle first.
    Solid point - I take multivitamins also.

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  • cypher1
    replied
    Originally posted by james.hendrickson View Post

    Why not just have a healthy, balanced and organic diet?
    I just realized this thread is from 4 years ago. But back to the subject, I agree a healthy diet for nutrition and lifestyle are the core essentials for overall well-being. As with sleep, and regular exercise behind it. But supplements can also contribute or compliment for healthy habits. In no way am I saying they should be the primary focus in well-being, without focus on nutrition and lifestyle first.

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  • cypher1
    replied
    Originally posted by dawnwes View Post
    Although I don't think vitamins and probiotics count, but I should check!
    I've bought my multi-vitamins and fish oil with my HSA the last 2 years.

    Separate topic, but I wish HSA would let us use to pay for gym membership. Luckily my employer gives us $300 for health reimbursement account (HRA) each year to apply.

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