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    New Bill Would Pay Americans $2000 a month

    https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2020...stimulus-bill/
    Coronavirus Relief: Proposed Bill Would Give Americans $2,000 A Month During Pandemic

    April 15, 2020 at 12:04 pm
    Filed Under:Coronavirus, Stimulus, Tim Ryan
    • PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Two House Democrats have introduced legislation that would give millions of Americans $2,000 per month during the coronavirus pandemic.
    The new bill is called the Emergency Money for the People Act.

    It was introduced by Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, and Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif.

    In a press release, Congressman Ryan says:

    “The economic impact of this virus is unprecedented for our country. As millions of Americans file for unemployment week over week, we have to work quickly to patch the dam – and that means putting cash in the hands of hard-working families.”
    The act would expand relief to more Americans and includes a $2,000 monthly payment to every qualifying American over the age of 16 until employment returns to pre-COVID-19 levels.

    “A one-time, twelve hundred dollar check isn’t going to cut it,” said Rep. Ro Khanna in a press release. “Americans need sustained cash infusions for the duration of this crisis in order to come out on the other side alive, healthy, and ready to get back to work. Members on both sides of the aisle are finally coming together around the idea of sending money out to people. Rep. Ryan and I are urging leadership to include this bill in the fourth COVID relief package to truly support the American working class.”

    Pennsylvania Congressman Mike Doyle was an original co-sponsor of the bill. More than a dozen other members of Congress also support the bill.

    Congressman Ryan says the bill also fixes a bug in the CARES Act to ensure college students and adults with disabilities can still receive the payments even if claimed as a dependent.

    The Emergency Money for the People Act additionally recognizes that not everyone has a bank or a home address to receive a check – so it allows individuals to get this money through direct deposit, check, pre-paid debit card, or mobile money platforms such as Venmo, Zelle, or PayPal.

    Here are the eligibility requirements:

    Eligibility:
    • Every American adult age 16 and older making less than $130,000 annually would receive at least $2,000 per month.
    • Married couples earning less than $260,000 would receive at least $4,000 per month.
    • Qualifying families with children will receive an additional $500 per child – families will receive funds for up to three children.
    • For example, a married couple making under $260K with 3 kids would receive $5,500 per month.
    • Those who had no earnings, were unemployed, or are currently unemployed would also be eligible.
    • Those who were not eligible in 2019 or 2018 but would be eligible in 2020, could submit at least two consecutive months of paychecks to verify income eligibility.
    • The Emergency Money for the People Act also expands the program to millions more Americans who were excluded from the CARES cash rebates – such as college students and adults with disabilities who are still claimed as a dependent. The individual will receive the payment and their parent or guardian will receive the dependent credit.

    Reps. Ryan and Khanna proposed the first cash infusion plan a month ago, which the Administration and Senate Republicans embraced, and was passed into law with the CARES Act.
    The Emergency Money for the People Act has been introduced by Rep. Ryan and Rep. Khanna as well as the following Original Co-sponsors: Earl Blumenauer (OR-3), Judy Chu (CA-27), Diana DeGette (CO-1), Mike Doyle (PA-18), Adriano Espaillat (NY-13), Eliot L. Engel (NY-16), Pramila Jayapal (WA-7), Ted Lieu (CA-33), Joe Neguse (CO-2), Mary, Gay Scanlon (PA-5), Darren Soto (FL-9), Rashida Tlaib (MI-13), Nydia Velázquez (NY-7), Bonnie Watson Coleman (NJ-12), Grace Meng (NY- 6), Alan Lowenthal (CA-47), and Barbara Lee (CA-13).

    Brian

    #2
    Oh, come on.... "...until unemployment returns to pre-COVID levels"?!? You mean the historically low unemployment levels that the country was previously enjoying? That's effectively making this thing permanent.

    I know that we've had some discussions here about UBI, and if that's what they want to do, then they need to do the full welfare system overhaul. Yikes.... That amount of monthly cash would amount to an extra 50% of my already healthy monthly take-home pay. Totally excessive.

    At least I can rest assured that there's no way this can pass & become law.
    "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by kork13 View Post
      Oh, come on.... "...until unemployment returns to pre-COVID levels"?!? You mean the historically low unemployment levels that the country was previously enjoying? That's effectively making this thing permanent.

      I know that we've had some discussions here about UBI, and if that's what they want to do, then they need to do the full welfare system overhaul. Yikes.... That amount of monthly cash would amount to an extra 50% of my already healthy monthly take-home pay. Totally excessive.

      At least I can rest assured that there's no way this can pass & become law.
      Kind of agree. I was able to get behind UBI because it would be part of a larger reform for other welfare programs and when I looked at the math for how to fund it, it worked. This feels far fetched.

      Comment


        #4
        I'm a fan of UBI as a replacement for other welfare programs and in general.

        I think this proposal is okay as a temporary thing for a few months to get through the current crisis but I agree that setting the end date as when unemployment returns to its previous level is absurd.

        I like that it would help those who don't qualify for unemployment, like my daughter. It would also help those who don't qualify for the stimulus check, like me (not that I'm in need of any help personally but many in my position very much are).

        It will be interesting to see if this gets any traction, even in a modified form.
        Steve

        * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
        * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
        * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

        Comment


          #5
          Frankly, I don't think it should be for everyone. Not all of us have been economically impacted.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by kork13 View Post
            Oh, come on.... "...until unemployment returns to pre-COVID levels"?!? You mean the historically low unemployment levels that the country was previously enjoying? That's effectively making this thing permanent.

            I know that we've had some discussions here about UBI, and if that's what they want to do, then they need to do the full welfare system overhaul. Yikes.... That amount of monthly cash would amount to an extra 50% of my already healthy monthly take-home pay. Totally excessive.

            At least I can rest assured that there's no way this can pass & become law.
            Of course it could. No doubt there would be some revisions along the way.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Petunia 100 View Post
              Frankly, I don't think it should be for everyone. Not all of us have been economically impacted.
              Picking and choosing would be impossible, though. Also, just like the stimulus checks, this is to help boost the economy. Give people extra money to spend. Yes, my income hasn't been impacted but my spending certainly has. If you throw a couple extra thousand at me every month, I guarantee you a bunch of it is going to end up helping to support stores and restaurants and businesses and charities that have been decimated by the shut downs.
              Steve

              * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
              * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
              * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

                Picking and choosing would be impossible, though. Also, just like the stimulus checks, this is to help boost the economy. Give people extra money to spend. Yes, my income hasn't been impacted but my spending certainly has. If you throw a couple extra thousand at me every month, I guarantee you a bunch of it is going to end up helping to support stores and restaurants and businesses and charities that have been decimated by the shut downs.
                I agree it would be a monumental task to determine who should get it and who should not.

                Comment


                  #9
                  $5500 a month would be a boon for people with 3 kids. Nice. I hope it passes in some form but at the same time I'd rather see Medicare for all. I wonder how the unemployment numbers will play out with so many losing health insurance. Doesn't that mean Medicaid people will qualify because their inccome is $0?
                  LivingAlmostLarge Blog

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
                    $5500 a month would be a boon for people with 3 kids. Nice. I hope it passes in some form but at the same time I'd rather see Medicare for all.
                    Yes, universal health care coverage would take care of one of most people's largest monthly expenses so that would ease things up on the rest of the budget. Of course, it's far easier to implement a straight out cash disbursement than to totally dismantle and build a brand new healthcare system in the country.
                    Steve

                    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Try expanding medicare and medicaid.. If medicare age was lowered to 55, and everyone enrolled upon birth we would have the problem solved in less than 55 years. And everyone on medicaid went onto medicare? That leaves only people 26-55 who work. I mean SO Many people take advantage and keep their kids on their insurance until age 26. Then we have less than a 25 year window? Then move all government and military to medicare and consolidate. I mean tricare is already socialized medicine and so is medicare. And people are very happy with medicare. So what percentage of people are left? And allow small businesses to buy into medicare? We'd be covering a good chunk of the country.

                      Crossing my fingers that the number of people who lost health insurance might cause this sort of crisis.
                      LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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