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how often do you guys invest

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    #16
    I automatically invest every two weeks in my 401(k), and monthly in taxable savings.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Nutria View Post

      Check the Roth withdrawal rules, if you have enough in there to be an E-fund, and if you can discriminate contributions from growth.



      This is tough, because it depends on interest rates. If they start to climb, BND's NAV will fall, and you won't have time for it to recover (due to higher yields).

      A trailing stop-loss or trailing stop-limit order might mitigate that, though.
      I don't know I didn't have time to invest our income. I probably should have invested the $300k DP for 1 year but then it seemed risky and we did buy within a year. We rented for 2 but the first year we were living off of cash savings so that seemed imprudent to invest it.
      LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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        #18
        I have set aside $16k for next year 2 ESA and 2 Roth IRA.
        Perhaps I'm misunderstanding here, but when you have this money set aside for Roth IRA, do you mean its the money you need right now to live off of so you can contribute from your paycheck to Roth IRA?

        I'm able to contribute $6,000 a year to my Roth IRA without going through payroll; I do this in a single lump sum from after tax money. I cannot contribute to Roth IRA through payroll due to my income and I don't get tax deductions for Traditional IRA contributions either. So every year I contribute $6,000 to my Traditional IRA (after-tax) and then I immediately transfer it to my Roth IRA (and don't have to pay any fees or taxes). However, the catch is you cannot have any remaining $ in all your Traditional IRA accounts by the end of the year you did this transfer, otherwise you'll face a penalty/tax. Fidelity allows me to do this and keeps track of it all so when I file taxes I have the appropriate paperwork for the IRS.

        If this isn't your situation (e.g. you can still contribute to Roth IRA normally due to being below income limit), then yes you should max out payroll contributions to Roth IRA.

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          #19
          Originally posted by sethmachine View Post

          Perhaps I'm misunderstanding here, but when you have this money set aside for Roth IRA, do you mean its the money you need right now to live off of so you can contribute from your paycheck to Roth IRA?

          I'm able to contribute $6,000 a year to my Roth IRA without going through payroll; I do this in a single lump sum from after tax money. I cannot contribute to Roth IRA through payroll due to my income and I don't get tax deductions for Traditional IRA contributions either. So every year I contribute $6,000 to my Traditional IRA (after-tax) and then I immediately transfer it to my Roth IRA (and don't have to pay any fees or taxes). However, the catch is you cannot have any remaining $ in all your Traditional IRA accounts by the end of the year you did this transfer, otherwise you'll face a penalty/tax. Fidelity allows me to do this and keeps track of it all so when I file taxes I have the appropriate paperwork for the IRS.

          If this isn't your situation (e.g. you can still contribute to Roth IRA normally due to being below income limit), then yes you should max out payroll contributions to Roth IRA.
          nope only backdoor roth every year
          LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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            #20
            To the title of the post "How often do you invest?"

            The 401K is of course monthly.

            For the IRA I try to hit all $6,000 at once, usually February or March. I've got a coworker who invest $500 per month in his. Either route gets you to the same place.

            In myself, is daily.

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