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Serious Question For the Board: Would You Invest in Marijuana Related Stocks?

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  • #31
    And to continue a bit on the above post, one of the animal shows I watch did a large segment on family pets that have gotten into the pot "edibles." They were saying with hospitalization, SOME of the pets have survived but the death toll is climbing as more states are legalizing and more companies are producing edibles that seem to be regular food.

    For a network that replays their shows ad infinitum, this particular show didn't get repeated, so I'm guessing it was a little too honest.

    I've had people my age (old!) tell me that the marijuana being sold today is nothing like the marijuana from back in the Woodstock era, and I think people may be basing their opinions on what it used to be like. I wish there were some large health and safety studies on it as there are with everything else, but as long as it's still federally illegal, I assume that won't happen.

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    • #32
      Interesting. I listened to an in depth podcast that actually suggested the opposite to be true. Forget the country but they actually decriminalized ALL drugs and spent the money that otherwise would have been spent jailing people on rehab programs and they saw a dramatic decrease in misuse. It almost became non-existent. They incentivized businesses to employ people with a history of drug use as a way of giving second (or third or fourth) chances. Was actually really fascinating and a bit utopian sounding

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      • #33
        Originally posted by riverwed070707 View Post
        Interesting. I listened to an in depth podcast that actually suggested the opposite to be true. Forget the country but they actually decriminalized ALL drugs and spent the money that otherwise would have been spent jailing people on rehab programs and they saw a dramatic decrease in misuse. It almost became non-existent. They incentivized businesses to employ people with a history of drug use as a way of giving second (or third or fourth) chances. Was actually really fascinating and a bit utopian sounding
        That is how they sell this idea that in some country it may work but not in America.

        I think the biggest difference besides population size is the fact people do not operate as a collective group. there is no respect for others or personal responsibility.

        Example: A discussion I had with a friend whom came from a country that had universal healthcare.We both knew a woman who went to doctors all the time for frivolous things here and friend told me that in her home country that was simply unacceptable and you are expected to use the system wisely and if you abused it you would feel like you were cheating your neighbors etc.

        HERE we have whole groups living off others and screaming for more with ZERO respect for those whose tax dollars are supporting it.

        I find it odd that if people open for example a new casino they have to dedicate a certain % for gambling addiction treatment ( at least in the area I live) but no money is needed for addiction / problems to open a pot shop if you get a state license.
        I can tell you in my area NO one needs to wait for a study the results are obvious. There are chronic users that simply do not function well enough to keep a job. The state KNOWS the street selling is rampant but I have seen zero efforts to find or stop it.
        Just by accident found a person with a huge growing operation ( 3 industrial warehouses) that was never licensed!
        How did that happen ? how did they not know who is licensed when they issue the license, they said they would be monitoring and inspecting sites. NOTHING they said was true. Not the normal some things but literally NOTHING was true.


        To me that says they know they are NOT collecting ALL the tax dollars they promised would pave the streets in gold.
        So if it was not about the taxes maybe it was hoping a stoned population would be easy to control.

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        • #34
          100% agree the model is not scaleable for the us, and that was discussed on the podcast as well, I just found the perspective interesting. I don't recall where you're from Smallsteps but I was in Portland last fall and was honestly appalled by the rampant and obvious drug abuse taking place in the downtown area. The public needle depositories, the homelessness, the aggressive pan handling and the number of people talking to themselves on the street was unrivaled to anywhere I've been and I travel quite extensively. I'm not sure that marijuana legalization is part of the problem or perhaps it was a problem before but they definitely are missing the mark somewhere.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by riverwed070707 View Post
            Interesting. I listened to an in depth podcast that actually suggested the opposite to be true. Forget the country but they actually decriminalized ALL drugs and spent the money that otherwise would have been spent jailing people on rehab programs and they saw a dramatic decrease in misuse. It almost became non-existent. They incentivized businesses to employ people with a history of drug use as a way of giving second (or third or fourth) chances. Was actually really fascinating and a bit utopian sounding
            I agree that stuff like this wouldn't work the same way in the US. It's an entirely different culture here.

            As for hiring people with an addiction history, not a chance in hell. You couldn't incentivize me enough to hire a known drug addict. I mean if someone has been clean for years, sure, but not if it's a recent issue.
            Steve

            * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
            * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
            * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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            • #36
              I don't have moral qualms about marijuana, but until it's decriminalized in all states and on the federal level, I wou;ldn't invest in it.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Keshet View Post
                I don't have moral qualms about marijuana, but until it's decriminalized in all states and on the federal level, I wou;ldn't invest in it.
                That's actually a good point. Marijuana is illegal - still. States have made it "legal" but that doesn't change or affect federal law. If the fed decides tomorrow to crack down on it, they could shut down all of those gummy bear and vape dispensaries.
                Steve

                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

                  That's actually a good point. Marijuana is illegal - still. States have made it "legal" but that doesn't change or affect federal law. If the fed decides tomorrow to crack down on it, they could shut down all of those gummy bear and vape dispensaries.
                  Yes, it means there is more political risk in the marijuana markets than in other markets. One wonders if this isn't factored into the price of marijuana stocks?
                  james.c.hendrickson@gmail.com
                  202.468.6043

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Keshet View Post
                    I don't have moral qualms about marijuana, but until it's decriminalized in all states and on the federal level, I wou;ldn't invest in it.
                    In the US sure. Most people who are investing in marijuana tech and production companies are investing in Canadian companies where it is federally legal.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by riverwed070707 View Post

                      In the US sure. Most people who are investing in marijuana tech and production companies are investing in Canadian companies where it is federally legal.
                      Not sure if that could prevent the US federal gov't from seizing your assets.

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Keshet View Post

                        Not sure if that could prevent the US federal gov't from seizing your assets.
                        I'm 100% certain that isn't a risk. If the government could just seize assets based on not agreeing with another country's politics, no one would invest in foreign stocks of any kind, and yet its the standard for a balanced portfolio.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Keshet View Post

                          Not sure if that could prevent the US federal gov't from seizing your assets.
                          That depends on what they are actually investing in. I think most people are invested in ETF's at this point and not individual stocks. ETF's focus on the legal aspects, so they are weighted towards pesticides, fertilizers, and equipment companies with a smidge of legal dispensaries. I'm more concerned about the ramifications of Chinese tariffs and Huawei affecting my stocks than the Feds busting up my ETF.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by msomnipotent View Post

                            That depends on what they are actually investing in. I think most people are invested in ETF's at this point and not individual stocks. ETF's focus on the legal aspects, so they are weighted towards pesticides, fertilizers, and equipment companies with a smidge of legal dispensaries. I'm more concerned about the ramifications of Chinese tariffs and Huawei affecting my stocks than the Feds busting up my ETF.
                            The question was specifically about investing in marijuana in another, not EFT's in general.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Keshet View Post

                              The question was specifically about investing in marijuana in another, not EFT's in general.
                              If I invest in a publicly traded foreign stock, I don't believe the US government has any right or ability to seize my investment just because it doesn't like what that company does.
                              Steve

                              * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                              * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                              * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

                                If I invest in a publicly traded foreign stock, I don't believe the US government has any right or ability to seize my investment just because it doesn't like what that company does.
                                Um, well, didn't the Fed shut down the alcohol industry under prohibition?
                                james.c.hendrickson@gmail.com
                                202.468.6043

                                Comment

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