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Free market medical care versus the status quo

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    #46
    TH, regardless of how it is implemented, public or private or some combo of both, do you think there should be healthcare for everyone? I do. I think healthcare is a fundamental right and everyone should have it so it just becomes a question of how to make that happen and how to pay for it. And I also believe that all of us who can should help support those who can't afford it. That's how a civilized society should work. There will always be people who, for various reasons, don't have the means or ability to take care of themselves and it's up to the rest of us to make sure they don't get left behind.
    Steve

    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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      #47
      Steve Iíll respond some time in the future if and when the site works.
      How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

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        #48
        Steve Iíll respond some time in the future if and when the site works.
        How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

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          #49
          Saw this article today... Seems there are efforts (vehemently opposed by healthcare industry leaders) to make costs more transparent. Not sure if or how this might improve that, but if it does go into effect, time will tell... https://www.washingtonpost.com/healt...39d_story.html
          "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

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            #50
            Steve, I do think basic healthcare is a right, just like shelter from the elements and food to prevent starvation. But "free" healthcare - provided by taxpayers - should be a whole different animal than what I might be $2500 a month for. If I buy OBummerCare right now, I'm paying $2500 for junk. That's because I'm paying my premium for junk, plus two or three other's premiums who have figured out a loophole to get a subsidy. In a free market situation, $2500 a monthwould buy you a Ferrari of a health plan with every bell and whistle. But because the government is playing Robin Hood and wealth redistribution with all of the money, the plans aren't worth a damn. A bunch of career Washington bureaucrats decide the coverages! And we do provide this basic care already - through Medicare, Medicaid, and various indigent programs in counties and municipalities throughout the country. Do I want to go to a foreign medical graduate for colon cancer? No, but if that's what my basic plan has, then I have no choice. The government keeps trying to fix a problem by layering on further regulation, which just makes it all that much worse. Every time they tamper, it just exacerbates the problem. Costs go higher, quality goes lower.
            How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

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              #51
              Transparency isn't a simple issue. Sure, it's easy to say how much a chest x-ray will be. It's more complex to say how much a Caesarean section will be. The first is a very straightforward procedure, 2 quick images, no special supplies or preparation needed. The second is a major surgical endeavor that can vary quite a bit from case to case, especially depending on whether or not it is planned or emergent, the health of the mother, and the health of the baby. You can come up with a ballpark figure but the actual cost can't be known until the procedure is complete.
              Steve

              * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
              * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
              * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

              Comment


                #52
                I like the transparency. Hospitals have been in rape and pillage mode for years. Steve, most hospitals can't even give you a ball park. They just charge what they charge and expect you to pay. Most of them don't want you to know what they charge, which is why they are vehemently fighting any transparency legislation. Where there is smoke, there is usually fire.
                How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your meat?

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                  #53
                  Originally posted by texashusker
                  And we do provide this basic care already - through Medicare, Medicaid, and various indigent programs in counties and municipalities throughout the country.
                  This topic actually came up in a discussion with some friends on Facebook the other day. Something was posted about a minimum wage worker ending up in the ICU because he can't afford insurance and thus can't afford his insulin. I commented saying that if he makes minimum wage, he would qualify for Medicaid, which is true here in NJ. Apparently it's not true everywhere. Many states didn't expand Medicaid when they could. My friends also said that in some states single people without children can't qualify for assistance at all unless they are senior citizens regardless of their income. Living in a very liberal state, I wasn't aware of that. So while public programs are available to some, there are a lot of gaps in that coverage currently.
                  Steve

                  * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                  * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                  * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                  Comment


                    #54
                    Originally posted by TexasHusker
                    I like the transparency. Hospitals have been in rape and pillage mode for years.
                    Oh, I agree completely. I wasn't saying there shouldn't be transparency. I was just pointing out that it's easier for some things than for others.

                    With a major medical procedure like an operation, you can't know in advance exactly what it will cost until it's done. How many bags of IV fluids will you use? Will a transfusion be necessary? How many sutures will get placed? Will you find something once you get in there that is more involved than anticipated requiring additional time and materials to repair?

                    It's not like taking your car to the shop where they give you an estimate and then call you if they find something else. They can't wake you up in the middle of the operation to say it's going to cost more than they thought. They need to keep going and worry about it later.
                    Steve

                    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                    Comment


                      #55
                      Steve -- While you're absolutely right that you never know exactly what things will become necessary in any given procedure, my understanding of these transparency rules is that they're just meant to inform patients of the costs involved, so that we can be more aware of the actual cost of our care. I don't know exactly how medical billing works (and I know it's a convoluted mess), but the rules only seem to call for the costs of some list of 300 "most common" procedures, which likely means the listing will include stuff like diagnostic imaging, immunizations/shots, lab work, base charge for clinic/ER visits, maybe some clinic/ER-administered medications, and basic stuff like that.
                      "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

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                        #56
                        kork13, the article you linked to specifically mentioned C-sections: "a list of 300 services that patients can schedule in advance, including X-rays and Caesarean sections." That's why I was talking about that.
                        Steve

                        * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                        * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                        * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                        Comment

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