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    Eclipse anticipation

    In Los Angeles we won't be getting the full eclipse but the excitement is starting to build. Anyone in the eclipse's path planning to view it.

    #2
    Originally posted by QuarterMillionMan View Post
    In Los Angeles we won't be getting the full eclipse but the excitement is starting to build. Anyone in the eclipse's path planning to view it.
    I got the glassss and will be taking a couple quick peeks.

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      #3
      I've seen eclipses 4-5 times, so it's not overly dramatic or exciting for me, but it's still interesting. I'll go outside & check it out. Unfortunately in Alaska, we're only going to get ~40% totality, so while it'll be cool, nothing crazy.

      One brother in law sent a bunch of the glasses that we'll try out, and he is driving to get into the totality band in Idaho. My other brother in law lives in Tennessee, and will get almost full totality from his backyard.

      I've read a bunch of articles lately about all of the tiny towns in the totality band that are getting swarmed with people. They're enacting emergency action protocols to handle the influx of people. Imagine a town of 2000 people in the middle of Oregon suddenly burgeoning to 10k+ ...!! The infrastructure can't support it, the emergency services can get overwhelmed, stores empty, roads become parking lots, and so on. Frankly, it's dangerous.
      "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

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        #4
        Michio Kaku, the famous gray hair'd astronomy professor on TV said in 100% totality areas it'll be like midnight and you'll be able to see stars. He also said animals will fall asleep and birds will be chirping as they do at sunset. I find it hard to believe animals will fall asleep, but the animals might freak out a little bit.

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          #5
          Another factoid according to CNBC from Joe Kernan, the eclipse will cost American businesses $700 million in lost productivity.

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            #6
            80% or so here in Pittsburgh.
            My employer is having an eclipse party today, because they know that there won't be any work getting done this afternoon anyway.
            Brian

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              #7
              My mother sent us some glasses for viewing. I'd have to drive 2 hours south for totality, but it should be 94% covered, so close enough. My husband saw signs on the interstate this weekend that warned people of the traffic on Monday due to the eclipse. Enjoy!
              My other blog is Your Organized Friend.

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                #8
                We'll be at 75-78%. I plan to take a walk outside a couple of times during it, especially at its peak around 2:45. I made a cereal box viewer this morning.
                Steve

                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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                  #9
                  It's 8 am in Los Angeles, eclipse scheduled for 10:21 am, a thick marine layer is making it tough to see the sky.

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                    #10
                    Here in Portland it is scheduled to start in at 9:08 AM Pacific. We will get something like 99.4% obscuration. It should be pretty amazing.
                    [email protected]
                    202.468.6043

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                      #11
                      Partial eclipse came and went in Los Angeles and it's like nothing happened. It was sunlight as usual. But I saw on the news in Oregon where it was completely dark.

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                        #12
                        I'm in NE Ohio we had 80% totality. It was pretty cool. People at work had NASA glasses so we went out and checked it out. At totality it looked like dusk. Can't wait till 2024 when Cleveland will be one of the 100% totality spots. But then it will be on April 8th so we'll probably have our last snowstorm of the year.

                        It's the first solar eclipse I've experienced. The last time there was one in Ohio was 1979, and I don't recall it.

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                          #13
                          I did get to view it with about 95% totality. Definitely not as good as 100% would have been. We did notice the change in light, almost like a filter had been put on. The temperature did cool briefly, and I did hear crickets chirping. It never did get fully dark...which was expected because of not being in the full totality area. I invited two neighbor friends and their kids to come over since I had two pairs of glasses. The kids brought their cereal box viewers, which was fun to try. The glasses worked far better though!

                          I enjoyed seeing the images on TV. I honestly got chills each time they showed the moon fully covering the sun! What a beautiful universe we live in.
                          My other blog is Your Organized Friend.

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                            #14
                            Was in 100% totality. Did not get dark as midnight by any means, but I could see two stars. In all directions the sky at the horizon looked orange, as if the sun were setting everywhere! Saw parallel moving "light stripes" on the ground. Some insects (crickets?) started making their night noises. The corona was cool. It was soft and flowy yet had starlike beams pointing outward. Jet condensation trails in the sky showed up like never before. As soon as sunlight peeked out again, some of those trails were no longer visible.

                            There was 23 seconds of totality over my house but we drove about 55 miles away to get the best chance for cloudless viewing and longer totality.

                            On the way home we drove for miles and miles on levee roads that follow the Mississippi. Normally you might have no other vehicles on the levee, or perhaps a pick-up or a tractor. But we encountered around twenty cars going the other way, one motorcyclist, and three bicyclists. Here and there, someone was stopped with a telescope or camera, or both. It was scary because the levee roads are about three stories high, narrow with no shoulders, poorly paved, no striping, and yet people will drive 50 miles an hour: LUNAtics.

                            Hey I'm looking for an eclipse emoticon. Let's just pretend this is me with my eclipse glasses.
                            "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

                            "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

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                              #15
                              I watched it earlier from olympic np. Not sure what the fuss was about. I think we had around 93% coverage. What was interesting was watching mountain goats climbing rocks right next to us. They werent concerned with the solar eclipse.

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