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  • Petunia 100
    replied
    Originally posted by james.hendrickson View Post
    My fail: constant overspending.
    On something in particular, or on everything? Might be worth examining the details and try to determine the cause.

    Leave a comment:


  • kork13
    replied
    Originally posted by scfr View Post
    This morning I did a pantry clean-out, organization, and inventory. Due to a combination of factors (buying more shelf-stable food due to the pandemic, never implementing a good system for using the far-from-ideal pantry setup in our rental, laziness / not pushing this up the priority list, general stress of the last year-and-a-half, and as much as I hate to admit it just getting older) there were foods I had to toss (UGH) ... 1/3 of a kitchen-size garbage can full. Foods that must be used up right away are now in a little tote on the kitchen counter. And I now have a month-by-month "use up" list through the end of the year. This will help me not only avoid wasting food waste, it will be part of the "eat down what we have and don't buy more" process before the move to our new house in the winter.

    So now I'm off to make some pasta sauce and granola using items in the "use it now" tote.
    Ugh, I've done that way too often... What kills me is when I let produce go bad.... such a waste of great food...

    FWIW, many (most) shelf-stable foods are just that -- very stable while sitting on the shelf, especially if unopened. While everything is required to have some sort of date to indicate freshness, words mean things. "Expires" dates are just that -- likely goes bad beyond that date. "Use by" is similar, but has some flex in it (give it a 'sniff test'). "Best by" dates only indicate that freshness/quality is not guaranteed after the given date, but the food item is still perfectly safe to eat (might just be slightly stale). Most shelf-stable foods will have this a 'best by' date, so while a box of 2 year old pasta might be past it's date, it's still fine to use. Those aren't hard and fast rules, but that's typically how many/most companies do their labeling.

    That said, having a system in place to help you use older stuff is definitely a good way forward. Putting it in your "use now" box might even inspire some creative cooking ideas, combining a variety of those items to use up. To help us with that, we use some of those can-rotator-things that rolls the old cans to the front & keeps new stuff in the back. We do the same thing with other stuff in the pantry/fridge -- when we go shopping, new purchases mostly go to the back to encourage use of the older stuff up front.

    Leave a comment:


  • scfr
    replied
    This morning I did a pantry clean-out, organization, and inventory. Due to a combination of factors (buying more shelf-stable food due to the pandemic, never implementing a good system for using the far-from-ideal pantry setup in our rental, laziness / not pushing this up the priority list, general stress of the last year-and-a-half, and as much as I hate to admit it just getting older) there were foods I had to toss (UGH) ... 1/3 of a kitchen-size garbage can full. Foods that must be used up right away are now in a little tote on the kitchen counter. And I now have a month-by-month "use up" list through the end of the year. This will help me not only avoid wasting food waste, it will be part of the "eat down what we have and don't buy more" process before the move to our new house in the winter.

    So now I'm off to make some pasta sauce and granola using items in the "use it now" tote.

    Leave a comment:


  • james.hendrickson
    replied
    My fail: constant overspending.

    Leave a comment:


  • Singuy
    replied
    Took a 40k loss on some Chinese stocks. Took a 90k loss on a house we bought in 2007 and sold in 2013.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nutria
    replied
    Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
    I should have invested for retirement sooner than 2005. We started in 2005 seriously when DH got his first job. Before then we invested in RE, which wasn't a mistake but instead we bought our first condo instead of using it in the stock market. I'm not sure which did better, I think RE because we rode the bubble up. But we probably should have still tried hard to save into a Roth IRA which was only $2k/year at the time.
    Don't fret. When my son was taking DOD-mandated personal finance classes, I had to remind him that (most especially for young people) there's more to life than retirement.

    Leave a comment:


  • ua_guy
    replied
    egad! I had forgotten I purchased 6 quarts of oil and a filter for a future oil change for my truck, because they were on sale. Well, I ended up selling the truck before I used it, and had forgotten I even had the stuff sitting on the shelf in the garage. I've been trying to sell it on craigslist for $20 or best offer (full synthetic, stuff wasn't cheap!). Really I just don't want it to go to waste.

    Leave a comment:


  • LivingAlmostLarge
    replied
    I should have invested for retirement sooner than 2005. We started in 2005 seriously when DH got his first job. Before then we invested in RE, which wasn't a mistake but instead we bought our first condo instead of using it in the stock market. I'm not sure which did better, I think RE because we rode the bubble up. But we probably should have still tried hard to save into a Roth IRA which was only $2k/year at the time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fishindude77
    replied
    Lost $600k on a large construction project we were doing due to a layout mistake which required a bunch of rework.
    That was a stressful couple months getting things corrected, all out of pocket, with a whizzed off client due to schedule delay. Does that count?

    Leave a comment:


  • bjl584
    replied
    Few years back I lost all my investment on Seadrill (SDRL) when they went bankrupt.
    I think I was out around 5K on that one.

    Leave a comment:


  • srblanco7
    replied
    As with many on this board, we've had more wins than losses. Nevertheless, tried some market timing in my 401k in the 90s. Was convinced the market was at a peak, so I moved most of my money to a "cash" alternative within the 401k. Eventually reinvested several months later with the market about 1000 points higher.

    Insurance for sure - as others have noted - when we finally shopped around a couple years ago, we saved close to $700/year for our bundle.

    ​​Going back in time, we also purchased and financed several new cars. I loathe car payments, and so the last three have been "new to us" cars (roughly 2 year old models) that we paid for in cash.

    Perhaps the biggest was that we allowed money to be a stressor in our relationship for the first decade of our marriage. This has since been corrected, and we're well aligned, but it certainly was a fail in multiple ways.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nutria
    replied
    Originally posted by kork13 View Post
    when I checked at 1-2 other companies, our current insurance was "only" ~10-15% (~$150-$200/yr) higher, and inertia (plus the stress of getting ready to deploy) won out, with me not pulling the trigger.
    This means that you're paying about $16/month for convenience (which is an order of magnitude less that Steve's over-payment). Unless your finances are really tight, that extra $16 might be a reasonable expense,

    Leave a comment:


  • kork13
    replied
    Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
    LAL's post reminded me of one. Auto insurance. We were paying a lot for many years and I just never bothered to shop around. When I did I was shocked by how much we saved. I don't remember the exact amount (I'm sure I posted about it at the time) but it was at least a couple hundred per month. I was embarrassed to realize we had been so grossly overpaying.
    Ugh... It's silly, but I've been avoiding this as well. We've got all of our insurance with USAA (2x cars, primary & rental homes, and life), which does fine, but it's definitely more expensive than other options. I know we're overpaying at least somewhat, but when I checked at 1-2 other companies, our current insurance was "only" ~10-15% (~$150-$200/yr) higher, and inertia (plus the stress of getting ready to deploy) won out, with me not pulling the trigger. Between having ALL of our insurance there and wanting a clean break, plus the hassle of shopping it all with each company individually, and unable to find a good broker to do the shopping around for us... blah.... I hate trying to deal with it all.

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    LAL's post reminded me of one. Auto insurance. We were paying a lot for many years and I just never bothered to shop around. When I did I was shocked by how much we saved. I don't remember the exact amount (I'm sure I posted about it at the time) but it was at least a couple hundred per month. I was embarrassed to realize we had been so grossly overpaying.

    Leave a comment:


  • TexasHusker
    replied
    Originally posted by Nutria View Post

    Was that an investment, or an expense?
    it was dumb.

    Leave a comment:

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