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    #16
    I'm sure there's some notable difference between the one-shot and the two-shot, but for me, the one-shot equates to one fewer errand I have to run, one fewer line I have to stand in, one fewer shot in the arm.

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      #17
      I took the Pfizer & will stick with the 2 shots in the future, but something is better than nothing.

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        #18
        Today I got scheduled (for Thursday) to get shot #1 of the vaccine series, because I'm deploying in April. Not certain which version they have this time around (this will be my base's 2nd batch of vaccine received), but I think they had Moderna for the first batch we got in late January. Either way, don't care -- rolling up my sleeve!
        "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

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          #19
          I just checked on the Pennsylvania CDC site yesterday.
          I'm in phase 1B
          They are still on phase 1A

          So, I'm not sure when I will be eligible
          Probably early summer

          Brian

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            #20
            As of this morning, the COVID-19 dash board from John Hopkins shows 28 Million total cases in the United States. Considering the population is 328 Million, that is less than 10% of the population has had it.

            In the past several weeks, the number of new infections have been dropping like a rock.

            Interestingly enough, this article by the Wall Street Journal, claims over 55% of the population has natural immunity, from previous infection.

            https://www.wsj.com/articles/well-ha...il-11613669731

            Early on I had guessed we'd have to be around 70% exposure before we had herd immunity. I am guessing we will be there before the end of March.

            If you're in one of the vulnerable groups and either vaccine becomes available, I'd say get it. It's less about reducing the probability of catching it, and more about reducing the effects if you do.

            For only 10% of the population to have tested positive while 55% has immunity, I suspect there are significantly more asymptomatic cases than we have been led to believe.

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              #21
              Originally posted by myrdale View Post
              As of this morning, the COVID-19 dash board from John Hopkins shows 28 Million total cases in the United States. Considering the population is 328 Million, that is less than 10% of the population has had it
              No, it means less that 10% of the population has tested positive. That's a very different statistic. Lots of people have had it but never got tested. Lots more likely had it but tested negative.

              I can tell you that we actively discourage people from getting tested in certain situations. For example, if one member of a household tests positive, we tell everyone else in that house to consider themselves positive and behave accordingly. We don't recommend testing every family member because it changes nothing. They still need to quarantine for 14 days whether they have symptoms or not.

              Some people get tested way too early so they get a false negative. We try to discourage those tests but ultimately many of them do get done. If someone walks in to our clinic at 9AM and says they woke up today with symptoms, there's a good chance they will test negative even if they are actually infected. If they don't get retested a couple of days later, there will never be any documentation of their positivity.

              Finally, the tests aren't perfect. There are false negatives. Swab technique, sample storage, and other factors can result in a false negative.

              I have zero doubt that far more than 28 million cases have occurred in the country based on all of this.
              Steve

              * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
              * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
              * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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                #22
                Originally posted by myrdale View Post
                As of this morning, the COVID-19 dash board from John Hopkins shows 28 Million total cases in the United States. Considering the population is 328 Million, that is less than 10% of the population has had it.

                In the past several weeks, the number of new infections have been dropping like a rock.

                Interestingly enough, this article by the Wall Street Journal, claims over 55% of the population has natural immunity, from previous infection.

                https://www.wsj.com/articles/well-ha...il-11613669731

                Early on I had guessed we'd have to be around 70% exposure before we had herd immunity. I am guessing we will be there before the end of March.

                If you're in one of the vulnerable groups and either vaccine becomes available, I'd say get it. It's less about reducing the probability of catching it, and more about reducing the effects if you do.

                For only 10% of the population to have tested positive while 55% has immunity, I suspect there are significantly more asymptomatic cases than we have been led to believe.
                I saw that piece. It was an opinion/commentary piece. (I am also hoping to get an immunization--though, the wait list in my county has not moved an inch in over a month--so, we will have to see.) I hope it all pans out. I am making hotel reservations for May.

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                  #23
                  J & J 1 shot vaccine 100% effective at preventing hospitalizations & deaths. Seems too good to be true. Is it even possible for a drug to make a 100% effectiveness claim?

                  Comment


                    #24
                    I already had covid. However, if I had my choice it would not be an mRNA vaccine.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by Snicks View Post
                      I already had covid. However, if I had my choice it would not be an mRNA vaccine.
                      Why not mRNA?

                      By the way you still need the vaccine even if you had COVID. Natural immunity probably only lasts 3 month.
                      Steve

                      * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                      * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                      * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by QuarterMillionMan View Post
                        J & J 1 shot vaccine 100% effective at preventing hospitalizations & deaths. Seems too good to be true. Is it even possible for a drug to make a 100% effectiveness claim?
                        100% effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths is a bit misleading in my opinion. COVID-19 without hospitalization during the acute phase of illness can cause longer term symptoms, sometimes very significant (that can impact one's ability to work and do basic daily functions). This "Long COVID" is not rare, and may become a population health crisis as its causes are still unclear and are not always resolving even several months after infection. I'd take a mRNA vaccine first, and the J and J if all I could get.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

                          No, it means less that 10% of the population has tested positive. That's a very different statistic. Lots of people have had it but never got tested. Lots more likely had it but tested negative.

                          I can tell you that we actively discourage people from getting tested in certain situations. For example, if one member of a household tests positive, we tell everyone else in that house to consider themselves positive and behave accordingly. We don't recommend testing every family member because it changes nothing. They still need to quarantine for 14 days whether they have symptoms or not.

                          Some people get tested way too early so they get a false negative. We try to discourage those tests but ultimately many of them do get done. If someone walks in to our clinic at 9AM and says they woke up today with symptoms, there's a good chance they will test negative even if they are actually infected. If they don't get retested a couple of days later, there will never be any documentation of their positivity.

                          Finally, the tests aren't perfect. There are false negatives. Swab technique, sample storage, and other factors can result in a false negative.

                          I have zero doubt that far more than 28 million cases have occurred in the country based on all of this.
                          Agree with this. If I had a number to guess of total cases in the US since the start of the pandemic- I'd say could be as high as 75-100 million. I think we are reaching population immunity within groups that are not social distancing strictly (so maybe 85% of the population?) and this is causes the drop we've seen in the last few weeks. People are not suddenly not getting together with family friends from outside their households. Cases are starting to plateau in recent days, so maybe variants are picking up steam a bit?

                          By the end of this year, we might be looking at two populations in the US: the previously infected and the vaccinated.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by QuarterMillionMan View Post
                            J & J 1 shot vaccine 100% effective at preventing hospitalizations & deaths. Seems too good to be true. Is it even possible for a drug to make a 100% effectiveness claim?
                            Originally posted by Snydley View Post
                            100% effective at preventing hospitalizations and deaths is a bit misleading in my opinion. COVID-19 without hospitalization .....
                            Agree with Snydley -- that's a misleading claim. It's not 100% effective at preventing infection -- I think that percentage is in the high 70s. The 2-shot series mRNA vaccines have a ~95% effectiveness at preventing infection (which is frankly pretty remarkable). What that statement really says is that people innoculated with J&J's vaccine did get infected with COVID, but none of their trial participants' infections were ever bad enough to result in hospitalization or death.

                            Bottom line: It's marketing. Whether by the company or the US gov't (not sure who described it that way), the statement is very clearly crafted to convey confidence in its effectiveness at protecting people...and glosses over the actual infection rate. Deceptive, but in the current environment (anti-vax, anti-COVID, anti-whatever), I can see why they'd do so.
                            "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by kork13 View Post
                              Today I got scheduled (for Thursday) to get shot #1 of the vaccine series, because I'm deploying in April. Not certain which version they have this time around (this will be my base's 2nd batch of vaccine received), but I think they had Moderna for the first batch we got in late January. Either way, don't care -- rolling up my sleeve!
                              Apparently it was Pfizer -- I now recall that when they were visiting squadrons to talk to everyone about the vaccine as they prepared to roll it out, they mentioned that our base's medical clinic has the freezers capable of the super-low-temp storage that the Pfizer vaccine requires (-80*F or something?).

                              It's not really a surprise that the military medical system is good at running a vaccination line... But I was impressed by how streamlined it was. Check in here, snake through the hallway, update medical record there, around the corner & sit for the shot, down to the next lobby to wait 10-30 min (to ensure no major, immediate adverse reaction), then check out & good to go. In & out in less than 20 minutes, wait time included. They must have been doing easily 100+ shots per hour, and this is a relatively small medical clinic with just 3 chairs/providers for vaccine administration. I've seen reports that the military will be assisting in the large-scale vaccine rollout across the country as doses become more readily available. I guarantee that my experience is 100% indicative of how those will go, which should be quite encouraging.

                              As for myself... No major side-effects (gratefully)... Sore arm, which is pretty standard for any vaccine... And I may not have been 100% "there" (mental acuity) with my long, very busy day today (6am-5pm -- lovely!)... But as much as I had going on (I literally sat at my desk for less than 10 minutes all day today), that whirlwind feeling may have had nothing to do with the vaccine, and more simply due to the fast pace of the day.
                              "Praestantia per minutus" ... "Acta non verba"

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by kork13 View Post
                                It's not really a surprise that the military medical system is good at running a vaccination line... But I was impressed by how streamlined it was.
                                Members of the military, especially the National Guard, are involved with many of the mass vaccination sites around the country. I know they are here in NJ and across the river in PA. That's been a huge help in ramping up these sites.

                                Steve

                                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                                Comment

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