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Flu shot & COVID vaccine, who is getting it or not?

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    #31
    Originally posted by ua_guy View Post
    Being healthy is great but it doesn't provide immunity--just strength.
    Rennigade is correct about the discussion of crap diets and lifestyle of the majority of Americans are not helping, while most are expecting a vaccine to be the answer to saving this econ... err...I mean country. No one wants to acknowledge the lack of focus on nutrition, or suggesting get more sleep, reducing stress, any vitamin deficiencies, staying physically active or incorporating some moderate exercise weekly. Are any of these suggestions a cure for Covid? No, but they lead to healthier lifestyle for most people, which also contributes to improving their immune system. I'm no health expert either, but maybe I've been thinking it all wrong by reducing alcohol, eating whole foods/less sugar, and working out the last few years if being healthy can't help my immune system.

    Instead, the media and politicians want to mainly focus on wearing a mask (which I'm not saying is wrong). But if anyone were to recommend focusing on their lifestyle choices, improving their immune system, they'd most likely be criticized or told to stay in their lane.
    "I'd buy that for a dollar!"

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      #32
      Being healthy provides natural resistance from diseases in general. Even if you're pretty healthy, but are extremely stressed or not getting sleep, etc, it lowers your resistance to fight off diseases.

      Getting coughed on by someone with covid doesn't mean you'll automatically get the disease. It all depends on your body's natural immune system, your general health, etc which work to prevent the disease, among many other diseases from taking hold. There's good reason why the elderly and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk

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        #33
        I agree being healthy is important and provides a baseline defense. But it doesn't provide immunity. A vaccine does, and vaccines are part of our evolutionary nature.

        No matter how healthy I am, I do rely on vaccines to "keep my body in check" against things like polio, hepatitis, tetanus. And there are healthy people who have died from covid. So yes, I absolutely want a safe/effective vaccine for covid when it comes out. And I'll take the flu vaccine too, because I'm a big baby and I really hate when I do get the flu despite my best attempts to avoid it. There are doctors who post in this forum, argue this with them. They'll tell ya.

        We can talk all day about how americans are so unhealthy and should lead healthier lifestyles, and we should. But let's not get all preachy in the middle of a global pandemic. To ~bs's point, there are people with compromised immune systems beyond just a sedentary lifestyle. Because they're old. Or they have other health issues. The vaccine stops the spread from a healthy person to one of those people, too. So it's even more important.

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          #34
          Originally posted by ua_guy View Post
          I agree being healthy is important and provides a baseline defense. But it doesn't provide immunity. A vaccine does, and vaccines are part of our evolutionary nature.

          No matter how healthy I am, I do rely on vaccines to "keep my body in check" against things like polio, hepatitis, tetanus. And there are healthy people who have died from covid. So yes, I absolutely want a safe/effective vaccine for covid when it comes out. And I'll take the flu vaccine too, because I'm a big baby and I really hate when I do get the flu despite my best attempts to avoid it. There are doctors who post in this forum, argue this with them. They'll tell ya.

          We can talk all day about how americans are so unhealthy and should lead healthier lifestyles, and we should. But let's not get all preachy in the middle of a global pandemic. To ~bs's point, there are people with compromised immune systems beyond just a sedentary lifestyle. Because they're old. Or they have other health issues. The vaccine stops the spread from a healthy person to one of those people, too. So it's even more important.
          100% to all of this. Sure, we all should be leading healthier lifestyles. But even if everyone magically started doing that today, we would still need vaccines to prevent disease and lessen their severity.

          Wearing a mask is something simple that everyone can do right now, today, to help prevent the spread of COVID.
          Social distancing is something that everyone can do right now, today to help prevent the spread of COVID.
          Getting a vaccine when it becomes available is something that everyone can do to help prevent the spread of COVID.

          That doesn't mean the lifestyle stuff isn't important. It absolutely is. But right now, there are immediate things that can be done by everyone that will have immediate results.
          Steve

          * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
          * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
          * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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            #35
            DH and I got our Flu shot today. DH had made an appointment with his Drs office to get the high dose flu shot, but they called today to say they were all out and they would call him when they got their next batch in (mid oct). So, we just decided to go to our local pharmacy--the first one was also out of the high dose flu shot, but the 2nd one had it.

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              #36
              Originally posted by disneysteve View Post


              4. There can be some cross reactivity with vaccines, so the vaccine may not only protect you from one strain, or even one disease. There's been some evidence with Covid that people who previously had other vaccines may be showing some immunity to Covid. With some vaccines like chicken pox or shingles or flu, we typically find that people who still contract the disease tend to get more mild cases than those who were not vaccinated.
              Our kids got the chicken pox vaccine when it first came out. Our youngest ended up getting chicken pox just before his third birthday. He had ten pox, no itching, no fever and was better in a few days. A friend declined the vaccine and her kids ended up in the hospital. Our older son did not catch it. It would be interesting to see if the younger one has stronger immunity than the other.

              disneysteve, if you have never had chicken pox (because you received the vaccine), can you still get shingles?

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                #37
                Originally posted by sblatner View Post
                disneysteve, if you have never had chicken pox (because you received the vaccine), can you still get shingles?
                Yes. You can still get shingles, just as you can still get chicken pox if you've had the vaccine.
                Steve

                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                Comment


                  #38
                  Originally posted by Like2Plan View Post
                  DH and I got our Flu shot today. DH had made an appointment with his Drs office to get the high dose flu shot, but they called today to say they were all out and they would call him when they got their next batch in (mid oct). So, we just decided to go to our local pharmacy--the first one was also out of the high dose flu shot, but the 2nd one had it.
                  I've never gotten a flu shot, but will this year. Can someone explain the high dose vs. low dose(?) shot? Which one should I be getting?

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Originally posted by moneybags View Post

                    I've never gotten a flu shot, but will this year. Can someone explain the high dose vs. low dose(?) shot? Which one should I be getting?
                    Everyone 6 months old and up should have a flu vaccine. People 65 and older should have the high dose vaccine as it has been found to result in better immunity in that group.
                    Steve

                    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by sblatner View Post



                      disneysteve, if you have never had chicken pox (because you received the vaccine), can you still get shingles?
                      Originally posted by disneysteve View Post

                      Yes. You can still get shingles, just as you can still get chicken pox if you've had the vaccine.
                      I think that would be a failure in the vaccine if you did. You have to have chicken pox before you can get shingles. It is the same virus that
                      causes shingles. Here is an article that explains it better than I can:

                      https://health.clevelandclinic.org/c...ad-chickenpox/

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by Like2Plan View Post
                        I think that would be a failure in the vaccine if you did.
                        Yes. No vaccine is 100% effective. There is always a chance that it won’t work and you’ll still get the disease.
                        Steve

                        * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                        * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                        * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                        Comment


                          #42
                          From what i recall, the low bar the federal government is setting for the vaccine is 50% effectiveness.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            this. Sigh. It'll be mild. DK1 had chicken pox at age 2 after getting the vaccine. It was mild and we weren't sure. Neither was the pediatrician. Our pediatrician had to call the one "old" dr on staff who said yep chicken pox. Turns out 30/40 something old parents can't remember what the hell chicken pox looked like when you were like 5 when you get it. Or in my case I somehow never got it and thankfully got the vaccine at age 20? Whenever it came out. DH had shingles at 28 yes he still has the scars on his ribs, after having chicken pox and being really healthy. Who knows why.
                            LivingAlmostLarge Blog

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                              #44
                              Originally posted by LivingAlmostLarge View Post
                              this. Sigh. It'll be mild. DK1 had chicken pox at age 2 after getting the vaccine. It was mild and we weren't sure. Neither was the pediatrician. Our pediatrician had to call the one "old" dr on staff who said yep chicken pox. Turns out 30/40 something old parents can't remember what the hell chicken pox looked like when you were like 5 when you get it. Or in my case I somehow never got it and thankfully got the vaccine at age 20? Whenever it came out. DH had shingles at 28 yes he still has the scars on his ribs, after having chicken pox and being really healthy. Who knows why.
                              I think back in the day, people really downplayed the risk of chicken pox and lifelong risk of recurring shingles infections. I'm guessing that they're now vaccinating children, because even for children, a vaccine is vastly better than contracting the disease to grant "semi-immunity".

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Originally posted by ~bs View Post
                                From what i recall, the low bar the federal government is setting for the vaccine is 50% effectiveness.
                                That's correct, which is in line with the requirements for other vaccines. Heck, some years the flu vaccine doesn't top 40% efficacy. The thinking is if we can get a 50% vaccine out by 2021, that will help some and the companies can continue to work on a better one that gets 70% or higher efficacy.

                                It's sort of like the shingles vaccine. The first one that came out, Zostavax, is 50-60% effective (and less than that in people 70+). The second one that came out later, Shingrix, is 97% effective. So even if you've had the Zostavax vaccine, it is recommended that you get the Shingrix vaccine. The Covid vaccine will probably be the same way. If you get the first one that comes out, there will probably be a better one in a couple of years that everyone should get even if they had the first one.
                                Steve

                                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                                Comment

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