Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What do kids who don't go to college or trade school do?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Seeker
    replied
    The fact is that they do the exact same things the most everyone else does.

    They learn on the job and grow or not based on who they are and what they seek.

    There's a very interesting article here:

    The Black Hole of Higher Education

    Although a bit dated is it's a very thought provoking article.

    In every positiion I've held, there were some HS grads and some college grads; in some positions there were people who have held no degree because they did not finish HS. I helped one such person with basic math skills because she was having issues with fractions and mathematic word problems to pass her GED.

    I am in the computer industry and hold a HS, college and even technical certifications that help me; but I can say that in all probablility, the college degree got me "looked-at" but it was me and my skills learnt mostly on the job, that got me hired.

    Where my husband works, they get kids with HS degrees and they train them and put them in the job.

    The problem is that good people are hard to find, and more and more businesses are probably seeing that a "college" education really does not mean as much as it used to.

    Sure some colleges are better than others; but in many cases, "people define their own future" by the "efforts" they put into what they do and college has little to do with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Originally posted by zetta View Post
    Are there any careers or jobs left where you can make a good living with only a high school diploma and no further training?
    BTW even though I fall into the anti-forced college camp I have to say having a high school diploma in this day in age means practically nothing..because the amount of info retained in high school is nearly worthless to most students (please don't post how wonderful your learning was, anyone here and in charge of their own finances is above average)

    Now take it back 100 years and you could get a 'white collar' job with an 8th grade education...which taught you MORE than todays high school. And you prolly didn't start formal schooling at 4 or 5, you started when mom and dad ran out of things to teach you....though for some folk that was early on for many it wasn't until after you could read write and do basic math. (also many 'graduating' with an 8th grade education were not 13...you graduated when you knew enough, not when the calender year said you were old enough)

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Originally posted by Joan.of.the.Arch View Post
    Here, I think phlebotomists usually go through a 6 or 8 week certificate program through the community colleges. But it is very poor pay. If one can get hired at a university hospital as a phlebotomist, though, the benefit such as tuition reimbursement and health insurance can dwarf the pay.
    yep she is a diabetic, keeps the job for the health insurance....

    Leave a comment:


  • Joan.of.the.Arch
    replied
    Here, I think phlebotomists usually go through a 6 or 8 week certificate program through the community colleges. But it is very poor pay. If one can get hired at a university hospital as a phlebotomist, though, the benefit such as tuition reimbursement and health insurance can dwarf the pay. The university hospitals here are all connected with private universities, so tuition is high and the value of that benefit is high. But anyone who wanted to support themselves in a halfway comfortable way would no longer stay in that job than they would forever stand in front of the fry basket at Burger Biggie.

    That said, a high school grad who does not want to stick it out at even a two year trade school also can find some <2 year job training programs at community colleges, and at proprietary "2-year" colleges (Some of the latter are largely scam operations set up to collect grant money from people they can be 75% certain are going to drop out in the first month.)

    Leave a comment:


  • bjl584
    replied
    That's a pretty broad question. Can I assume that you are assuming that people that don't go to college will be stuck working menial jobs? this may or may not be the case. My old neighbor dropped out of high school, and today he is a millionare. On the other hand, my current neighbor never went to college, she earns minimum wage at the local grocery store. So, I think that financial success in life is a lot more complex than the amount of education that one has. Education defenitely helps, but it isn't the whole picture.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
    That would be a phlebotomist. Around here, phlebotomists go through an allied health trade school program to get trained and certified. Same for EKG techs, ultrasound techs and various other medical ancillary services. You don't need a college degree but you do need formal education beyond high school.
    Firefox doesn't recognize 'phlebotomist' which explains why I can't spell it . (and she does have medical training, just not college)

    Leave a comment:


  • disneysteve
    replied
    Originally posted by M-squared View Post
    I see a lot of people posting that they don't use their college degree for the job they currently have. I would argue that not using your specific degree is a lot different than not going to college at all.
    I agree. Just because you aren't working in your degree field doesn't mean you aren't using your education. I have a degree in Biology but over the 4 years of college, I took classes in English lit and comp, math, Spanish, history, art, philosophy, theater and more. So even if I wasn't working in a science-based job, odds are I'd still be using some aspect of my college education.
    Originally posted by PrincessPerky View Post
    My cousin ins in the medical field..can't spell the name, but she draws blood.
    That would be a phlebotomist. Around here, phlebotomists go through an allied health trade school program to get trained and certified. Same for EKG techs, ultrasound techs and various other medical ancillary services. You don't need a college degree but you do need formal education beyond high school.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thrif-t
    replied
    Originally posted by M-squared View Post
    I see a lot of people posting that they don't use their college degree for the job they currently have. I would argue that not using your specific degree is a lot different than not going to college at all. 20 or 30 years ago, it might have been possible to get a job straight out of high school and work your way up in the ranks, but today, I think it's a different matter.
    I so totally agree with this. Most places for entry level won't even consider you without a degree. I think for my kids a degree will be a necessity for their working career. Gone are the days of pensions, not too many will have those to look forward to anymore. I'm even worried about my DHs county pension being there when he'll be ready to collect it.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Originally posted by M-squared View Post
    I'm pretty sure you have to go through some sort of training to be a licensed midwife.
    That depends on the state, a CNM (certified Nurse Midwife) or a NM (nurse midwife) would need to be a nurse. but not all women who competently deliver babies are nurses.

    Leave a comment:


  • M-squared
    replied
    Originally posted by PrincessPerky View Post

    My midwife does not use a degree to deliver (never asked if she had one or not) I am sure if I had time I could think of others.
    I'm pretty sure you have to go through some sort of training to be a licensed midwife.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    My cousin ins in the medical field..can't spell the name, but she draws blood.

    Her sister went to college...does nothing, has to send her kids back to mom cause she can't support them.

    I took the old old fashioned route, I got married no pay, but very worth it.

    My husband is in the computer field..college is not helpful there, tho pices of paper saying you can do work do tend to get one raises easier...and from experience, folks with said paper CANNOT do the work..so DH is avoiding getting them on general principle....not great for the pocket book, but I understand it.

    My father in law is a bit outdated to be an example, but he worked in a steel mill, made more than my husband in his later years, and has a very comfortable retirement right now...course he currently works in a funeral home...not sure how well that can pay, but doesn't need a college degree for his part. (not sure about the actual undertaking/fixing bodies up part)

    Many folk I know do not use their degree or may not have one, I just never asked. (not entirely certain my father has one, and he makes the most of folks I personally know)...

    Around here lots of guys get into construction..even the lower ranks make a decent living..course that might be because they tend to be illegal aliens and not pay taxes...not sure how well paying it is if you have to hand over half to the govt. The upper ranks get paid quite well - to fully staff sites without letting the govt know how.....

    My midwife does not use a degree to deliver (never asked if she had one or not) I am sure if I had time I could think of others.

    Leave a comment:


  • M-squared
    replied
    I see a lot of people posting that they don't use their college degree for the job they currently have. I would argue that not using your specific degree is a lot different than not going to college at all. 20 or 30 years ago, it might have been possible to get a job straight out of high school and work your way up in the ranks, but today, I think it's a different matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • JBinKC
    replied
    Most jobs working in casino operations don't require a college degree and they pay for the most part at or above the national average depending upon location but its nothing like the good old days when they made an ungodly huge amount of money like in the 70s in Atlantic City.

    Other than being a baccarat dealer in Monte Carlo which does require a minimum knowledge of 7 languages with Chinese and Japanese required are paid close to 7 figures. Dealers at the Wynn in Vegas makes close to 6 figures but that is the highest to my knowledge in the states.


    If you go to school today a geologist is probably one of the more coveted degree to acquire today. Most of them with a bachelor's are starting at 100K out of school thanks to the commodities boom and huge shortage of qualified people. I saw this on Bloomberg a month ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • veronak
    replied
    Well I did not go straight to college and managed to work myself up to management at a UPS call center, then there was a strike and I was laid off. Next I went to a mail order pharmacy and again worked myself up, quit that job took a pay cut and went some place else which I hated then was fired, yes fired because the assistant manager for some reason was upset with me and I still don't know why. Later I found a job at a pharmacy got the management position and started school. That place closed and now I over see (assist) in running the office at a PT clinic. It's strange but I just realized that every job I have had I have moved up, even without my college degree. For me it is not the degree that matters but what you know, I have seen people with master’s degrees and have no clue...imagine if I had went right away

    Leave a comment:


  • Homebody
    replied
    I know a bunch of people who don't use their college degrees. I have one daughter who didn't go and is like me, a medical transcriptionist. She was a 911 dispatcher and can go back to that and make good money, good retirement, etc.

    I have a nephew with a degree in biology/chemistry and he is an alcoholic beverage salesman, drives around to liquor stores, etc and takes orders.

    My sister was a teacher for many years and now works at Blue Cross/Blue Shield as a customer service rep and makes decent money and has a very good retirement plan there.

    My BIL used to scrub toilets at Boeing, moved through the ranks to deal with building permits and now works for Sound Transit Seattle with a good salary/retirement (my sister doesn't have to work).

    My own husband was a carpenter/foreman for many years and then we bought into a business he now runs, we have three partners (one my former boss) and we have expanded into two more. We do okay.

    I think it is a matter of finding what you are good at and working hard.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X