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What do kids who don't go to college or trade school do?

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    #16
    Originally posted by M-squared View Post
    I see a lot of people posting that they don't use their college degree for the job they currently have. I would argue that not using your specific degree is a lot different than not going to college at all.
    I agree. Just because you aren't working in your degree field doesn't mean you aren't using your education. I have a degree in Biology but over the 4 years of college, I took classes in English lit and comp, math, Spanish, history, art, philosophy, theater and more. So even if I wasn't working in a science-based job, odds are I'd still be using some aspect of my college education.
    Originally posted by PrincessPerky View Post
    My cousin ins in the medical field..can't spell the name, but she draws blood.
    That would be a phlebotomist. Around here, phlebotomists go through an allied health trade school program to get trained and certified. Same for EKG techs, ultrasound techs and various other medical ancillary services. You don't need a college degree but you do need formal education beyond high school.
    Steve

    * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
    * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
    * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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      #17
      Originally posted by disneysteve View Post
      That would be a phlebotomist. Around here, phlebotomists go through an allied health trade school program to get trained and certified. Same for EKG techs, ultrasound techs and various other medical ancillary services. You don't need a college degree but you do need formal education beyond high school.
      Firefox doesn't recognize 'phlebotomist' which explains why I can't spell it . (and she does have medical training, just not college)

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        #18
        That's a pretty broad question. Can I assume that you are assuming that people that don't go to college will be stuck working menial jobs? this may or may not be the case. My old neighbor dropped out of high school, and today he is a millionare. On the other hand, my current neighbor never went to college, she earns minimum wage at the local grocery store. So, I think that financial success in life is a lot more complex than the amount of education that one has. Education defenitely helps, but it isn't the whole picture.
        Brian

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          #19
          Here, I think phlebotomists usually go through a 6 or 8 week certificate program through the community colleges. But it is very poor pay. If one can get hired at a university hospital as a phlebotomist, though, the benefit such as tuition reimbursement and health insurance can dwarf the pay. The university hospitals here are all connected with private universities, so tuition is high and the value of that benefit is high. But anyone who wanted to support themselves in a halfway comfortable way would no longer stay in that job than they would forever stand in front of the fry basket at Burger Biggie.

          That said, a high school grad who does not want to stick it out at even a two year trade school also can find some <2 year job training programs at community colleges, and at proprietary "2-year" colleges (Some of the latter are largely scam operations set up to collect grant money from people they can be 75% certain are going to drop out in the first month.)
          "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

          "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

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            #20
            Originally posted by Joan.of.the.Arch View Post
            Here, I think phlebotomists usually go through a 6 or 8 week certificate program through the community colleges. But it is very poor pay. If one can get hired at a university hospital as a phlebotomist, though, the benefit such as tuition reimbursement and health insurance can dwarf the pay.
            yep she is a diabetic, keeps the job for the health insurance....

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              #21
              Originally posted by zetta View Post
              Are there any careers or jobs left where you can make a good living with only a high school diploma and no further training?
              BTW even though I fall into the anti-forced college camp I have to say having a high school diploma in this day in age means practically nothing..because the amount of info retained in high school is nearly worthless to most students (please don't post how wonderful your learning was, anyone here and in charge of their own finances is above average)

              Now take it back 100 years and you could get a 'white collar' job with an 8th grade education...which taught you MORE than todays high school. And you prolly didn't start formal schooling at 4 or 5, you started when mom and dad ran out of things to teach you....though for some folk that was early on for many it wasn't until after you could read write and do basic math. (also many 'graduating' with an 8th grade education were not 13...you graduated when you knew enough, not when the calender year said you were old enough)

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                #22
                The fact is that they do the exact same things the most everyone else does.

                They learn on the job and grow or not based on who they are and what they seek.

                There's a very interesting article here:

                The Black Hole of Higher Education

                Although a bit dated is it's a very thought provoking article.

                In every positiion I've held, there were some HS grads and some college grads; in some positions there were people who have held no degree because they did not finish HS. I helped one such person with basic math skills because she was having issues with fractions and mathematic word problems to pass her GED.

                I am in the computer industry and hold a HS, college and even technical certifications that help me; but I can say that in all probablility, the college degree got me "looked-at" but it was me and my skills learnt mostly on the job, that got me hired.

                Where my husband works, they get kids with HS degrees and they train them and put them in the job.

                The problem is that good people are hard to find, and more and more businesses are probably seeing that a "college" education really does not mean as much as it used to.

                Sure some colleges are better than others; but in many cases, "people define their own future" by the "efforts" they put into what they do and college has little to do with it.

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