Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • pearlieq
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by cptacek
    I don't understand something. If you just buy food to put in the pantry and then cook from the pantry, how does that save you money vs. going to the store (or coming home from work and stopping at the store that is on the way) to get the ingredients you need to cook?
    The are at least 3 opportunities for savings:

    1.) If you keep a stocked pantry, you can buy several of an item when it goes on sale. If you stop at the store on the way home, there's no guarantee the product you need will be on sale--you'll have to pay full price more often than you would if you planned ahead.

    2.) Every time you walk into the store it's an opportunity to buy stuff. If you go to the store once a week and happen to grab a candy bar or a favorite magazine, hey, you're only human. But if you're going to the store every day, there's a good chance you'll be making more frequent impluse puchases.

    3.) If you keep a stocked pantry, you'll be prepared for times when getting to the store isn't practical. What if there's a storm? What if you're home sick that day? What if you've had a rotten day at work and just don't feel like stopping? Having a pantry full of ingredients makes it easier to get away without calling for a pizza!

    Leave a comment:


  • cptacek
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    <quote> and I only have a pot garden, not a real one. </quote>

    Thank goodness in another post you said it was a "container garden"...I was worried that you would not be able to eat on less than $50 a month (cause of the munchiees)

    I didn't know you could freeze milk. When you let it thaw, do you have to mix it up again? If I get the cheap milk it goes bad, so I get the organic ultra-pasturized milk with is more expensive. Does it taste any different?

    I don't understand something. If you just buy food to put in the pantry and then cook from the pantry, how does that save you money vs. going to the store (or coming home from work and stopping at the store that is on the way) to get the ingredients you need to cook?

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I noticed thruought the book that all her 'contact so and so' were all snail mail, which makes sense for hte times, but obviously not up to date.

    I was wondering how to find buk food wholesaleres, I am not happy with the cost of flour here...or spices, but I can't see myself growing any.

    Oh and one thing I recalled rereading her books, sometime she puts in things that I totally disagree iwth (I read well over a book a day to my kids, and often hear the older two read at least once a day) Often in the face of 'I would never do that' it is very hard to find the nuggets we would do, too busy being all self rightous about what is 'wrong' with her way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by PrincessPerky
    I would like to know what/how she is doing now...but I would be to chicken to call her. Iw ould also love to have some of her information updated to include the internet options we have nowadays.
    Youíll come up with some very good pearls of wisdom since I have posted the last topic on ĎEnd Substitute Abuseí Vol 1 p209 (CTG)

    I just loved reading all yours posts. Thank you to all.

    Think we should try and do some of this updating ourselves. I donít mean rewriting the book.

    I would love everyone to come up some ideas on new options that we now enjoy that Amy didnít have when this book was written. Posting these comments when you think of them here.

    Donít think there is any new information out on Amyís lifestyle now only I think she is still in Maine.

    I'll post a new topic soon.

    Leave a comment:


  • boefixepa
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Yes, that would be nice. I am sure with the internet you are open to so many more options. I have found much better per pound pricing, but once you add shipping it's generally better just to buy it where I am.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I would like to know what/how she is doing now...but I would be to chicken to call her. Iw ould also love to have some of her information updated to include the internet options we have nowadays.

    Leave a comment:


  • boefixepa
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I know what you mean. I read many of the atricles to remind me and to stay motivated. There are many things I am still trying to incorporate into my lifestyle, but I am trying to do it slowly so that I don't get shocked.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    hmm, I wonder if that information is in the owners manual?
    thanks for telling me where to look.

    BTW when I said not to much useful I meant in terms of new ideas, I always find reading on the subject to be useful, keeps the 'gotta have its' at bay.

    Leave a comment:


  • boefixepa
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    You have to look on the back of your dryer and find out how much electricity it uses, then pull your electrical bill and see how much you are charged the kilowatt hour. Do the math with the amount of time and that should be close. It will vary by load, the longer time, the higher cost. It's too much work, in my opinion. I just dry as little as possible...

    The thought of moving my dryer to read the numbers, probably covered in dust and lent, just doesn't sound worth it to me....

    You might see if your dryer manufacture has a web site that lists it....it's a possibility...or some other fancy website where bored, inspired or number minded people figure things like this out.

    I wonder if she averaged the cost of the dryer in over it's life time....or if she figured you scrounged it???

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I finally got her 'complete' book out of the library and I am finding so many interesting things..nbot to much useful, (I do alot of what I am willing to do already)

    but one thing cought my eye, she repeatedly says it costs 44cents to run the dryer..how would I find out how accurate this is? I was under the impression it was like 10cents? If it really is 44 cents I will by line drying more stuff! (well closet drying, or swing drying...no line allowed)

    Leave a comment:


  • boefixepa
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    In her book Amy does point out that we save to reach our goals. For her that was a large family and an old farm house. She and her husband did what they needed to make their dreams come true. She did point out that once they were more 'comfotable' in the money shpere, it did not change their lifestyle, but it did offer them more choices. She sites having her roof redone by a contractor rather than doing it themselves. They had the funds, but could have done it themselves. The time it would have taken away from their young family made them choose to spend the funds. The reason...the time with their children was more vaulable to them then the money. She baises on priority and what's most important to the indiviual. She also says something about how about 10% the kindest thing to the environment will cost a little more and now that they have the funds they go that route more often. I think by and large they have chosen frugality as a lifestyle and still live it. They were young and still have many years of life ahead of them...which I am sure they will enjoy!

    Leave a comment:


  • Duchesse
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by pearlieq
    I picked this up at the library yesterday and re-read it today.

    I think I've come to the conclusion I'm not a tightwad.

    I certainly believe in getting full value for a dollar, working toward frugal living, and keeping a mindful eye on my consumption and the environmental impact thereof, but I honestly identified more with the guy she quoted who asked her "Why don't you lighten up and take your kids to McDonald's once in a while!"

    This is not to say I didn't get any value out of her book, or that I disapprove of how she raises her family. If this works for them, more power to them! I picked up lots of useful tips, but I just don't find myself on a campaign to spend the absolute minimum possible on life. I prefer to balance between frugality and indulgence.

    Amy D mentioned in her book that tightwads come in many shapes and sizes. I agree but, I see tightwads on a continuous line

    some being on one end , some being on the other , and most of us falling in the middle ,


    all trying to save toward our dreams. There is no right or wrong in tightwaddery. It is whatever works for you. If you can't use powdered milk, then drink fresh milk and find another way to save. We all do it.

    You save where you can without affecting the quality of the life YOU want to live.

    Leave a comment:


  • lrjohnson
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by pearlieq
    I just wouldn't want to live her life!
    Now there we can agree! Having one kid would do me in; the idea of six makes me shudder. Not the work so much-she does stay at home and has a real active husband-but I just am not a fan of kids. I'm happy other people have and like them, but me, nope, keep them away.

    Leave a comment:


  • pearlieq
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by lrjohnson
    But I just don't see where Amy has given up anything that's important to her; on the contrary, she made her dream come true.
    I think you're right, and I certainly admire her drive to get what she wanted. I just wouldn't want to live her life!

    On a related note, has there ever been any kind of follow-up on her life? She may not be Bill Gates, but I imagine she much have made a pretty penny with the newsletter and subsequent books.

    Did she ever talk about what life was like after her commercial success?

    Leave a comment:


  • lrjohnson
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by pearlieq
    I prefer to balance between frugality and indulgence.
    I love Amy, so it would be hard not to defend her, even when she doesn't need defending and you are not attacking.

    But, hey, she admits at the very beginning that 6 kids and a huge farmhouse is NOT exactly frugal, and could be considered indulgent. Me, I don't like kids, Amy and I have different priorities. But I just don't see where Amy has given up anything that's important to her; on the contrary, she made her dream come true.

    I love using milk powder for cooking, as milk for cereal, as creamer. We don't drink milk. Well, sometimes I love hot milk with vanilla at night. And I'm just fine with the powdered stuff. I just don't get the strong feelings some people have about. There are some people at work who don't have the same thrifty habits but in general they express a small amount of appreciation or admiration for my lifestlye choices. However they just think powdered milk is as low as you can go. Weird to me.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X