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  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by katwoman
    Tightwad Kitty thanks for starting (and keeping up) this thread! You broke me down and I ordered TCTG from Amazon ($12.99)! I always wanted a copy for my own but couldn't find it on ebay or the other sites for cheap.

    As for the book- I admired what Amy D was able to do but it was done out of neccessity. Which means anyone can do it IF they so desire. She wanted a home and a rather large family while having limited means. Not everyone is destitute or cheap or even wants to go to such extremes. That doesn't mean I throw away money. I coupon and stockpile but I also eat out almost everyday. It's a trade off of sorts.

    The book is a good beginning BUT you have to know a) why you're adopting a frugal lifestyle and b) where do you want to be years from now. Frugal for the sake of being frugal is meaningless. Let me explain: I have a friend who believes she can't afford anything. Going out to breakfast or lunch with her is agonizing because if she wants a bagel, and it costs .50 more, she won't get it. She likes blue cheese dressing but not for a penny more than what the other dressings cost. She will not order a drink; she drinks water instead. She imposes certain restaurants on me (or even the rest of the group) because she feels she gets a larger meal (or rather, more bang for her buck) where she wants to go. Then she complains she has to make ALL the decisions on where to eat! Here's the kicker: she has NO IDEA what her property taxes are, how much her utilities are, what her car payment is, etc. YET, she can't afford anything. Except to eat out twice a day. Her "frugality" gets on everybody's nerves! When she chastises me for ordering a soda with my meal I say I can since I have NO soda at home unlike her who has cans and cans of soda (one reason why she and her husband are overweight).

    She simply cannot see the forrest from the trees and this is what's frustrating.
    My goal is to keep this thread on the first page of this section if possible!
    Good for you on buying TCTG.

    {As for the book- I admired what Amy D was able to do but it was done out of necessity. Which means anyone can do it IF they so desire. She wanted a home and a rather large family while having limited means. Not everyone is destitute or cheap or even wants to go to such extremes. That doesn't mean I throw away money. I coupon and stockpile but I also eat out almost everyday. It's a trade off of sorts.}

    To each they own way of being frugal. What I see as being frugal may be seen as being a miser in the eye of someone who is more wasteful and extravagant. Then they will ask you for lend of $50 so they can get to work until next pay day, then it’s ‘I bit short this week as my car payment & rent are due etc’. when pay day comes.

    How many times have you seen this happen?

    As for your friend, start going to the places that you all would like to go too! Take a vote on it when you are with these others. Look for vouchers for other restaurants that give disounts off total the bill if you can!

    As for soda that you order, just reply ‘ That’s my treat this week, seeing that I don’t have any at home!’

    I dine with a group of friends each month. We did have the same problem at times too! But the Casino stops us from sitting as a group so we had to changes restaurants to a cheaper one that gives us 20% discount off each too!

    Katwoman quote ~ She simply cannot see the forrest from the trees and this is what's frustrating.
    As for ideas of what’s frugal, start talking about some of the stories that you have read on this site. To get your point across. When you are with her! They don't have to be your own!

    I hope my thoughts on your post are helpful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by PrincessPerky
    I always felt that a new purchase had to be worth it, so I can afford X or Y, I pick which one makes me happiest (cabel net, not cable tv, etc)

    I think alot of those sort of decisions are personal choice, so I have ivory soap (cheap) but fancier conditioner, someone else might care more about the soap, and not the conditioner. Which a lot of people translate that someone doing the different set of priorities is 'cheap' I am prolly guilty of that (I don't reuse ziplocks!)
    It’s should always boils down to CHOICE and what you would to like or need to spend money on. I had cable for six months when it first came here before I had a computer.

    Most of the deals were free this or that kind of thing. In the end I paid for 3 months and other 3 free because when I went to cancel it they gave me another deal pay one month and another two free. To see if my watching it would improve, in the end I cancel because it got worse down to ½ hour per week. I cancel it at end of the time. Now I have cable broadband and use it all the time. I don’t have enough time to watch TV.

    I once was an AVON lady, I still have a lot of stuff to use up so no more need to said on that one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by stngymama
    I'm just joining this discussion, so please excuse any mistakes in etiquette!
    "Meeting" Amy D. probably kept us out of bankruptcy -literally, as we were having to put over 30% of our income into debt repayment, another 20% just towards our mortgage. I started getting her newsletters about 2 years before she quit and read her books so many times I could quote her at the drop of a hat! When I first had the books, I was spending a lot of time in the car shuttling kids, lots of time waiting. I always had the book and would read and reread the different articles.
    The overall concept of questioning everything radicalized my thinking.
    I used a price book for years, but recently, with the high cost of gas, I only go to 3 stores for their particular specialties (a supermarket, an incredible market for fresh fruit/veggies, and a meat market). For me it isn't worth shopping around anymore.
    The idea of ratcheting down things to the lowest tolerable level is brilliant, and yes radical in our culture!
    Finally, I wanted to share a concept for sharing/trading goods with others ("trading up...temporary ownership"). It's called Freecycling. The concept is to post what you have/need via email on your locally based Freecycle Yahoo group. It works: there are over 2 Million "members"! Check 'em out: Freecycle.org
    Sorry this is so long.....hopefully will post more later: Need to dig out my CTWG!
    Stngmama ~ I'm just joining this discussion, so please excuse any mistakes in etiquette!

    Welcome to Saving Advice & to this thread.
    I have set this thread up, so that anyone can come in at anytime, all you need to do name the article volume and page number that you quoting, it need not be the one that I have posted, just from the Tightwad Gazette that all! If you have anything to add to a topic or to any articles just do so quoting the article and click on QUOTE in the post, if you are referring to a point in the current topic or any topic for that matter!

    Stngmama ~ "Meeting" Amy D. probably kept us out of bankruptcy -literally,....... I started getting her newsletters about 2 years before she quit and read her books so many times I could quote her at the drop of a hat!....

    Until 6 years ago I had never heard of Amy D. It’s only in the 2003, did I get a copy of the CTG book for the first time. You were very lucky to meet her at time you did, I am happy for you that things have improved from reading her newsletters and book.

    The overall concept of questioning everything radicalized my thinking.
    You may be able to come up with some of your thoughts on Amy’s Articles along with mime!

    I love your phrase on ‘Seeking the minimum level …..’The idea of ratcheting down things to the lowest tolerable level is brilliant, and yes radical in our culture!’

    On to reference the Price book point ….Yes with High cost of gas, if you live too far from a Shopping Centre that has more than one supermarket in the same area. It may be best to review this strategy a little. As I found here in Australia, if there are more than one supermarket and Asian groceries stores in the same centre then they will compete with one another for your dollar. On top of that you need to go to these shopping centres if you need department stores and banking. I live within a 20-30 minutes drive to six of these Shopping Complexes. As well as smaller shopping centres that are in the local area.

    ‘Three Principles of Used Acquisition’ Vol 1 (p165 CTG)
    Looking for new ways to ‘putting out the word’ since this article was written, as we are now more Globule with computers and internet. Can anyone think of any more.
    Check 'em out: Freecycle.org ("trading up...temporary ownership").

    Thank you again for your input.

    If I can get into Saving Advice, I will reply to other posts soon! Site has been unavailable to me until now!

    Leave a comment:


  • lrjohnson
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I think someone not ready for Amy D. still gets something out of it. It plants seeds. A person can read it and think, "Re-using coffe filters? Dumpster diving?" And toss it aside. And then, months or years later, when there is more debt, or an item someone really wants but doesn't have the money for, they can think back, "didn't that frugal lady end up with what she wanted by being cheap? Maybe I can get what I want. Maybe I can give up these other things to make what I want happen."

    Princess, I second you wholeheartedly: if you go for cheap soap and fancy conditioner, that's just fine. Same if someone goes both cheap, or both fancy, or fancy soap, as long as they have made a conscious decision. So much spending is unconscious. You know you get value out of and appreciate pricier conditioner: you are getting value for you money and you are aware of your spending.

    I want to spend where I get value, and that may not be like Amy D, or anyone on this board. But in her intro in her very first book, she says that she went for the big house, but someone else could decide to go small house to afford a fleet of ATVs, if that's what they wanted.

    Amy D is about conscious spending, and I believe many of us are about conscious spending. I wash ziplocs and travel. To other people travel may be a waste of large sums of money, while washing ziplocs irritates them because they never dry quite right and look silly on the dishrack while only saving pennies. We can both be tightwads.

    Whew! I felt a surge there!

    Leave a comment:


  • stngymama
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I think there are two aspects to being frugal/tightwadish: the more global one is lifestyle choice: you choose to spend a certain way, and find other "things" not worth it or even offensively expensive. The obvious , more specific aspect, is if you have a goal; for us, getting out of debt; others, perhaps saving for an important purchase.
    Those who overtly agonize haven't really committed themselves to either; personally, I don't think Amy's writings are very good at motivating that inital commitment.
    Anyhow, Amy's newsletters, were originally a compilation of hundreds, if not thousands, of tips from diehard tightwads. I doubt if anyone follows every suggestion. We drew the line at dumpster diving (esp. since, living in an urban area, there was too much competition from the "pros" ).
    I think if someone needs to save (and knows why), Amy's stuff can be like boot camp. Tough, strict, but meant to give you the mindset.

    Leave a comment:


  • katwoman
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Tightwad Kitty thanks for starting (and keeping up) this thread! You broke me down and I ordered TCTG from Amazon ($12.99)! I always wanted a copy for my own but couldn't find it on ebay or the other sites for cheap.

    As for the book- I admired what Amy D was able to do but it was done out of neccessity. Which means anyone can do it IF they so desire. She wanted a home and a rather large family while having limited means. Not everyone is destitute or cheap or even wants to go to such extremes. That doesn't mean I throw away money. I coupon and stockpile but I also eat out almost everyday. It's a trade off of sorts.

    The book is a good beginning BUT you have to know a) why you're adopting a frugal lifestyle and b) where do you want to be years from now. Frugal for the sake of being frugal is meaningless. Let me explain: I have a friend who believes she can't afford anything. Going out to breakfast or lunch with her is agonizing because if she wants a bagel, and it costs .50 more, she won't get it. She likes blue cheese dressing but not for a penny more than what the other dressings cost. She will not order a drink; she drinks water instead. She imposes certain restaurants on me (or even the rest of the group) because she feels she gets a larger meal (or rather, more bang for her buck) where she wants to go. Then she complains she has to make ALL the decisions on where to eat! Here's the kicker: she has NO IDEA what her property taxes are, how much her utilities are, what her car payment is, etc. YET, she can't afford anything. Except to eat out twice a day. Her "frugality" gets on everybody's nerves! When she chastises me for ordering a soda with my meal I say I can since I have NO soda at home unlike her who has cans and cans of soda (one reason why she and her husband are overweight).

    She simply cannot see the forrest from the trees and this is what's frustrating.

    Leave a comment:


  • PrincessPerky
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I always felt that a new purchase had to be worth it, so I can afford X or Y, I pick which one makes me happiest (cabel net, not cable tv, etc)

    I think alot of those sort of decisions are personal choice, so I have ivory soap (cheap) but fancier conditioner, someone else might care more about the soap, and not the conditioner. Which a lot of people translate that someone doing the different set of priorities is 'cheap' I am prolly guilty of that (I don't reuse ziplocks!)

    Leave a comment:


  • stngymama
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I'm just joining this discussion, so please excuse any mistakes in etiquette! "Meeting" Amy D. probably kept us out of bankruptcy -literally, as we were having to put over 30% of our income into debt repayment, another 20% just towards our mortgage. I started getting her newsletters about 2 years before she quit and read her books so many times I could quote her at the drop of a hat! When I first had the books, I was spending a lot of time in the car shuttling kids, lots of time waiting. I always had the book and would read and reread the different articles.
    The overall concept of questioning everything radicalized my thinking.
    I used a price book for years, but recently, with the high cost of gas, I only go to 3 stores for their particular specialties (a supermarket, an incredible market for fresh fruit/veggies, and a meat market). For me it isn't worth shopping around anymore.
    The idea of ratcheting down things to the lowest tolerable level is brilliant, and yes radical in our culture!
    Finally, I wanted to share a concept for sharing/trading goods with others ("trading up...temporary ownership"). It's called Freecycling. The concept is to post what you have/need via email on your locally based Freecycle Yahoo group. It works: there are over 2 Million "members"! Check 'em out: Freecycle.org
    Sorry this is so long.....hopefully will post more later: Need to dig out my CTWG!

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by lrjohnson
    Seeking the minimum is a simple idea, but actually kind of radical in our consumer culture today. Sometimes when I choose to do without something, people have asked, "can't you afford [full cable, new ziplocs, a VCR]?" It's hard for them to realize that I choose not to buy items even though I have money in my acocunt to buy them. I am not sensitive to shampoos, soaps, or conditioners: I always buy the cheapest of the cheap, generic, off brand, whatever. I could buy a $12 bottle, but the .99 is just fine. I use the least amount of shampoo and conditioner I can, and don't always condition.
    I love your phrase ‘Seeking the minimum is a simple idea, but actually kind of radical in our consumer culture today.’ I have been always square peg in a round hole kind of person in this consumer culture of ours, I will not replace anything until I can’t fix, then only if I have too!

    My son thinks 17: I am too radical in my frugal ways and I haven’t even started yet. If I live to be a 100 with what I got now, I will need to be verrrrrrry frugal indeed.

    Leave a comment:


  • lrjohnson
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Seeking the minimum is a simple idea, but actually kind of radical in our consumer culture today. Sometimes when I choose to do without something, people have asked, "can't you afford [full cable, new ziplocs, a VCR]?" It's hard for them to realize that I choose not to buy items even though I have money in my acocunt to buy them. I am not sensitive to shampoos, soaps, or conditioners: I always buy the cheapest of the cheap, generic, off brand, whatever. I could buy a $12 bottle, but the .99 is just fine. I use the least amount of shampoo and conditioner I can, and don't always condition.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    I will come back to the above topic at a later date.

    Here is my favourite quote in the book, I do keep jotting this phrase down each time that I read it, when I first started to read 'The Tightwad Gazette'. I started a journal and notes on my views on many of the topics, this is mainly what I am writing here. Also writing down my strategies using Amy's methods, it made me focus on looking for strategies and patterns in what I was doing!

    My favorite quote is from 20-20 TV Vol 2 (p 539 CTG) “Point is to ‘seek the minimum level’ or find the cheapest satisfactory solution.”

    My view on this “seek the minimum level or find the cheapest satisfactory solution.” that you can live with, then go up one or two levels knowing that you can go down if the need arises.

    Another article can be found in the book, ‘SEEKING THE MINIMUM LEVEL’ Vol 1 p87-89 (CTG) on this subject which should be read in conjunction with 20-20 TV. One article is telling you about this strategy and the other tells you how this can be done.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Well I have read another article around this topic this week.

    How to buy food in bulk! Vol 1 (p35 CTG)

    TG quote “Bulk buying isn’t just for big families. Simply put but enough to get you to the next sale or enough until it’s convenient for you stop there again.”

    I buy only items that have long shelf life. Only by enough that I can use in 8 weeks to six months depending on the item. Once I bought dishwashing detergent 12 bottles @ 50% off but took 4 years to use it up!

    I have access to a number of specialty Continental & Asian importers & warehouse stores less than 20 minutes drive, so I only buy what I need for that month. I budget $20 per month to restock in storage areas out of my budget. Mostly I buy what you call “loss leader”, here that term is illegal to use by retailers but it’s what is put on front pages of the catalogues each week or manager’s store specials.

    This is one way to stretch you dollar a lot further. Only buy items at their cheapest price.

    This week our local store has catalogue is full of manager's specials at the their lowest point too!

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by pyotr
    If you're ever bored, do what I did about 2 years ago, go into about 6 or more of your local grocery stores with a pre-pared list of specific items - my list was about 12 pages long (Excel format), on the left column was the item (generic sphaghetti 16oz, Mueller's sphaghetti 16oz, generic whole wheat bread loaf, Merita whole wheat bread loaf, etc.). The other columns were the prices paid at the various stores (ALDI, Harris Teeter, WinnDixie, FoodLion, BJ's, Walmarts, Target, etc.). It took me about a month to input all the data and it was maddeningly tedious but occasionally interrupted by spectacular hi-jinks.

    At every one of the stores I did this in, after various intervals of time, the junior manager, then the senior managers came up to me, first asking me where I was from or who I was with, then asking me politely to stop doing what I was doing. At a Lowes grocery store, I was escorted out . Many of the managers did not believe me when I told them I was just doing this to compare prices (one told me that he knew I was a spy and knew which store I was from ) The most expensive store seemed to care the least (Harris Teeters), that manager told me I was wasting my time and left me alone. In the end, I stopped bothering with the price book because I realized that ALDI's was cheaper for just about everything except milk, eggs, sugar, and flour. BJ's was good for milk and eggs, and FoodLion for sugar and flour. In rechecking these figures over a couple of years, these prices fluctuated somewhat but ALDI's wins easily all the time (except milk, eggs,flour, and sugar).
    As I have about 20 –25 brand name items on my list and balance is store brands or generic. I don’t have a problem with hassling and I only do one section at a time.

    When I writing information up inside a store, I use an old envelope with piece of cardboard inside it (to make it stronger) and making it look like shopping list as some stores, think you are price checking for another store and not for yourself. I was a price checker and stock controller when I was working, we only did a few items at time and never more than one page at time.

    Most of the information I use, I get outside the stores and just check other sizes of same item and prices and generic or other brands in the store. Now that our supermarket are going over to 15 –25 % store brands in each section this task will be a bit harder as they trying to win back Aldi customers and their profit margin is high too for them!

    Read this article in Tightwad Gazette
    Avoiding the price-book hassle’ Vol 2 (p558 CTG) for more information on price book and this problem of being hassle by managers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tightwad Kitty
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Originally posted by Ima saver
    Could some tell me about Aldi's. I never heard of it and there are none around here.

    Hi Ima

    Have a look in Food & Recipes area at 'Mad at Aldi shoppers' most of the answers are there! There are 13 topics on the board with Aldi in them.

    As I live in Australia, it's best if some else answers your question. Here the website for Aldi has a map that will tell you how far it's to the nearest Aldi store from your subrub or area.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ima saver
    replied
    Re: Re-reading Tightwad Gazette

    Could some tell me about Aldi's. I never heard of it and there are none around here.

    Leave a comment:

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