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How to use dehydrated gluten patties?

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    How to use dehydrated gluten patties?

    I bought a bag of dehydrated gluten disks or patties. Um, like mock duck, I guess. Does anyone know how to reconstitute them? Do I soak them in water, then boil? Or do I just boil them? The package says they are seasoned, and to me, they kind of look already cooked. So maybe the dehyration process cooked them and I only need to steep them in hot water.

    Once they are rehydrated, I do know how to use them. I've used tinned gluten before and I've even made my own from scratch, extracting it from flour. Just have never dealt with this dry stuff before. Help?
    "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

    "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

    #2
    oh my goodness. Sorry to say, but that sounds gross. be sure to let us know what they taste like!

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      #3
      Package didn't have cooking instructions? I'd Google it.
      Steve

      * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
      * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
      * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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        #4
        I don't think it is any more gross than dried pasta. It is time consuming to make fresh pasta, so I bet 99% of people buy dried pasta as a convenience. It is time consuming to make gluten as well, so why not buy it dried for the convenience as well. It is made from the same ingredients as pasta: Flour and water.

        I already tried Google for this. There are no cooking directions on the package. I tried the website listed on the bag. They had recipes for their other products, but not even a mention of this one.
        Last edited by Joan.of.the.Arch; 01-22-2009, 09:02 AM.
        "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

        "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

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          #5
          There are some vegetarian forums online. I'll find the website for you and post it here. I'm sure if you post the question on there, someone will know.

          Try veggieboards.com
          Last edited by disneysteve; 01-22-2009, 07:59 AM.
          Steve

          * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
          * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
          * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

          Comment


            #6
            I guess it was the "mock duck" part. So, when reconstituted, this is supposed to taste like meat?

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              #7
              Well, I wouldn't exactly say it is supposed to taste like meat, as it is a traditional food on its own not meant to mimic meat. It is, however, a source of protein in the diet, as is meat. Mock duck is the name it is given when it is prepared a certain way. I've never had it prepared that way. As far as I know it is always prepared to taste savory and a bit salty, so it would share that in common with meat. It does have a somewhat meaty texture, too-- a little chewy, but not tough. I really love it in good Chinese food. It is in my favorite Chinese dish, Buddha's Delight--mmmm. Oh, gluten is what seitan made of. Maybe you know seitan?
              Last edited by Joan.of.the.Arch; 01-24-2009, 02:36 PM.
              "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

              "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

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                #8
                I thought Gluten was the starchy stuff in flour?

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                  #9
                  No, it is the protein part of the flour. The starchy part gets rinsed away. You "should" should try making it with your kids, some day PrincessPerky. It will help them to understand what is going in when you knead bread dough to "develop" the gluten in it. It is kind of amazing to see it happen right before your eyes. You can find directions on the internet, of course. Oh and the leftover starch is so white, much whiter than the original flour. Well, that is using bleached white flour anyway. I guess the leftover starch could be used like cornstarch for gravies, puddings, and starching laundry (yeah, like I'm gonna do that! )
                  "There is some ontological doubt as to whether it may even be possible in principle to nail down these things in the universe we're given to study." --text msg from my kid

                  "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." --Frederick Douglass

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Oh. When we cut wheat, if the wheat is dry enough, you can scoop half a handful out of the bin and chew and chew and chew, and it eventually starts gumming up into a ball. It gets tough like chewing gum does. That is probably what the reconstituted wheat gluten tastes like. Although, it doesn't taste like much to me...the spices would probably be what saves the dish! (like rice really doesn't taste like much without butter and salt a pepper!)

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                      #11
                      Some rice tastes pretty good...depends on the kind. white rice or worse minute rice, IMO tastes like school glue...

                      Joan, I might have to google that, I definitely need to learn more about it and keep my protein and starch separate (though I was right in thinking it was the bonding stuff)

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