Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

With the Delta variant increasing should a fully vax person get different brand vax?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    [QUOTE=disneysteve;n725983]

    So you think all of the people coming in sick and testing positive don't actually have COVID? If your theory is right, how do we prove it, and what do we do about it? Do you think we should just stop testing people who have been vaccinated regardless of their symptoms? That doesn't seem right. We know no vaccine is 100% effective. And vaccinated people can still infect others so it's important to know that they have it.

    For the record, I don't agree with your theory anyway. There have been too many examples already where an unvaccinated family member got COVID and then the other vaccinated members in the household got sick a few days later and tested positive. That can't be a coincidence.[/QUOTE]

    I am talking about vaccinated people who are completely asymptomatic and do not transmit to unvaccinated household members- those are what I am hesitant to call a "breakthrough infection" (like some Yankees players, for example). Symptomatic (even mild) is an actual infection than could put others at risk. I am not hearing of this much at all, however, if mRNA vaccinated with both doses and not immunocompromised...are you seeing this in your clinic?

    Comment


      #17
      [QUOTE=rennigade;n725982]

      I should clarify. I didnt mean its better to get the virus. What im saying is, people that I know who have had it and recovered from it, whether it was a week or a couple months, are better off than those who minds have been warped by the constant fear mongering. Depression and anxiety have lasting effects that can ruin peoples lives for years. Ill take getting covid and feeling terrible for 3 months vs being depressed for years. And yes, I know people have died from this. Where's the beating a dead horse emoji? I thought that used to be an option under the smiley faces.[/QUOTE]

      The wild thing about this virus is we just cannot predict yet who is going to have mild disease and recover, or 3 months of illness and recover, versus potentially being permanently disabled. It is not rare at all (~10-20%) for people to not return to 100% health a year post-infection. The scary thing is it's looking like the virus might induce autoimmune disease in people (especially middle-aged women, but kids too) and autoimmune diseases are very hard to treat and can be debilitating/life threatening.

      I think the depression and anxiety issues are very real and very terrible too, and they are extending beyond COVID news..politics, etc. Honestly it's probably best to just watch the 6 o'clock news a few times a week on TV and not look at the internet for anything but email, this site, and maybe Pinterest? I do like the adirondack moose sighting group on facebook, if I could only look at that and nothing else there..

      Comment


        #18
        If not careful, one can succumb to their own fear of the virus. The news media is a bit like a salad bar. Visit when you are hungry. But if you stay there and eat all day, bad things are going to happen.

        I like the approach of: Things have gotten a lot better. Personally, I’ve freely gathered with family and friends, all vaccinated. We’ve gone out to eat, and spring/summer are wonderful opportunities to eat outdoors when possible. Grocery shopping with or without a mask doesn’t make it any more or less enjoyable. The question remains of: what next? …and how to close out the infection potential that remains?

        The falsehood is that there is an organized effort to get people to be fearful, to trap them into a certain way of thinking, and that the government or media is somehow leading it. That people don’t think for themselves… They do. The reality of all of this has actually been scary. Loved ones have died. The virus is being a virus, and that’s not something the “media” has created.

        The other thing is…who said anyone is living in fear? Or are people adjusting to something actually playing out in reality? I can think of so many great stories of people taking time during the pandemic to readjust priorities, pursue new things, get things done, focus on their health. It’s not all death and destruction. The mortality rate is becoming clearer, and the clearer that becomes, so does the need to be selfless and think of others who are vulnerable. IMO, focus on the more important lessons of the pandemic. These lessons are ignored by so many.
        Last edited by ua_guy; 07-16-2021, 07:11 AM.

        Comment


          #19
          [QUOTE=Snydley;n725984]

          I am talking about vaccinated people who are completely asymptomatic and do not transmit to unvaccinated household members- those are what I am hesitant to call a "breakthrough infection" (like some Yankees players, for example). [B]Symptomatic (even mild) is an actual infection than could put others at risk. [/B]I am not hearing of this much at all, however, if mRNA vaccinated with both doses and not immunocompromised...are you seeing this in your clinic?[/QUOTE]

          Yes, medical facilities around the world are seeing thousands and thousands of vaccinated patients coming in symptomatic and testing positive for COVID. Almost entirely relatively mild cases but cases none the less. I personally know several people who got COVID despite being fully vaccinated (including one who then passed it on to her wife who wasn't yet vaccinated) and I have seen a couple at work, though I've been on a leave of absence for the past 2 months so I haven't really worked since the Delta variant hit full force. I go back tomorrow and have no doubt that I will be seeing more going forward.

          The vaccine works extremely well at preventing serious illness, hospitalization, and death. It works less well at preventing infection and more mild illness. In that regard, it's really not all that different than the flu shot. Every year I see dozens of patients with the flu despite having been vaccinated but they are generally less serious cases.

          I do have one friend who works at Rush Medical Center in Chicago. She said the number of hospitalized COVID patients has shot up in recent weeks. Most are unvaccinated but there are a few who are vaccinated. I don't know the details but a "mild" case in a patient with pre-existing medical problems can easily turn out to be not so mild. If someone with COPD and heart disease gets COVID despite being vaccinated, they may still end up in the hospital.

          WEAR A MASK! It's a pretty simple thing to do. And by all means, if you haven't gotten vaccinated yet, do it ASAP!
          Steve

          * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
          * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
          * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

          Comment


            #20
            [QUOTE=ua_guy;n725986]The question remains of: what next? …and how to close out the infection potential that remains?[/QUOTE]

            The only way to fix this is with the vaccine. Unfortunately, you've got nearly half the population convinced vaccines are evil. We just saw the largest conservative gathering in the world and the crowd cheered when the speaker mentioned that the US had failed to meet the vaccination goal. They somehow see that as a good thing. It's insane and deeply disturbing.
            Steve

            * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
            * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
            * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

            Comment


              #21
              [QUOTE=rennigade;n725982]
              ...The mental strain on people is at tipping point. I know a lot of people who had covid who are better off than those who havent had it yet...[/QUOTE]

              Well, I am in the older cohort and the covid virus has not been so beneficial to all those folks who I know who have survived it. I'm not really sure why, but they were fine before covid and after: memory problems, aphasia etc. The difference between living alone without help and now needing additional varying levels of help. There isn't a lot of information being put out on that (probably because folks don't know the exact mechanism of whats going wrong). Sure, surviving the disease puts you in the "win" column, but the quality of life [I]might[/I] not be the same after.

              I agree with you about the mental strain. And, the media[I] is [/I]trying to sell their product. But, still I would rather know what was going on than ignoring it.

              In my lifetime, I have never seen anything like this-it is truly baffling. The latest chapter is the controversy over the vaccine. Hundreds of years, vaccines have proven their effectiveness at preventing disease. I know that the polio vaccine roll out had some problems when it first came out. Now, we are on the brink of wiping out "wild" polio (not sure if we will ever get to that point, but a couple of years ago we were pretty close).

              Back in the 1950's and 60’s most folks were extremely grateful that there was finally something that would be effective in preventing a really terrible disease. And, guess what-- while there were asymptomatic cases of polio, I never heard of parents opting out of the vaccine because they thought their kid might get a "light" case of polio….

              Comment


                #22
                [QUOTE=disneysteve;n725992]

                The only way to fix this is with the vaccine.[/QUOTE]

                Natural herd immunity would be another way to fix this albeit it will take a lot longer. The Spanish flu of 1918 was a good example of herd immunity since I don't think the medical technology at the time invented vaccinations, although I could be wrong.

                Comment


                  #23
                  [QUOTE=QuarterMillionMan;n725994]

                  Natural herd immunity

                  [/QUOTE]

                  Well yeah, though tens or hundreds of thousands more might die in the process. And we're not yet sure if you develop lasting immunity after infection.
                  Steve

                  * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                  * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                  * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    [QUOTE=disneysteve;n725995]

                    Well yeah, though tens or hundreds of thousands more might die in the process. And we're not yet sure if you develop lasting immunity after infection.[/QUOTE]

                    I'm thinking herd immunity could kick in by the fall as ~30% of the US has been infected and the new infections are mostly hitting the unvaccinated. Immunity is holding up well in the previously infected, with reinfection rates ~0.7% as I understand. I can't believe the amount of vaccine hesitancy. I've heard from multiple people "I just don't know enough about this vaccine yet" ?? We know the virus can wind up in your brain, you want that?

                    Comment


                      #25
                      [QUOTE=disneysteve;n725991]

                      Yes, medical facilities around the world are seeing thousands and thousands of vaccinated patients coming in symptomatic and testing positive for COVID. Almost entirely relatively mild cases but cases none the less. [B]I personally know several people who got COVID despite being fully vaccinated [/B](including one who then passed it on to her wife who wasn't yet vaccinated) and I have seen a couple at work, though I've been on a leave of absence for the past 2 months so I haven't really worked since the Delta variant hit full force. I go back tomorrow and have no doubt that I will be seeing more going forward.

                      [B]The vaccine works extremely well at preventing serious illness, hospitalization, and death. It works less well at preventing infection and more mild illness. In that regard, it's really not all that different than the flu shot.[/B] Every year I see dozens of patients with the flu despite having been vaccinated but they are generally less serious cases.

                      I do have one friend who works at Rush Medical Center in Chicago. She said the number of hospitalized COVID patients has shot up in recent weeks. Most are unvaccinated but there are a few who are vaccinated. I don't know the details but a "mild" case in a patient with pre-existing medical problems can easily turn out to be not so mild. If someone with COPD and heart disease gets COVID despite being vaccinated, they may still end up in the hospital.

                      WEAR A MASK! It's a pretty simple thing to do. And by all means, if you haven't gotten vaccinated yet, do it ASAP![/QUOTE]

                      Interesting, I haven't heard of this many infections at all from fully vaccinated with mRNA vaccines, and Moderna and Pfizer work much much better than flu shots at preventing infections (95% of adults and 100% of 12-15 year olds in the trials). J and J I would expect more symptomatic breakthrogh cases.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        [QUOTE=Snydley;n725997]

                        Interesting, I haven't heard of this many infections at all from fully vaccinated

                        [/QUOTE]

                        I belong to an online national urgent care provider group and there are pretty much daily posts about how many positive COVID tests people are seeing in fully vaccinated patients that are coming in. Based on that alone, it seems to be increasingly common. It will be some time before official data catches up and we get details of which vaccine people had, how long post vaccination the infections occurred, etc. All of this is still quite new.
                        Steve

                        * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                        * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                        * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          [QUOTE=QuarterMillionMan;n725965]
                          Especially, since the anti-vaxxers don't want it (I'll take it).
                          [/QUOTE]

                          This is just another example of the hysteria and fear mongering inflicted on the people of our country by a political party and the media that are driven by having absolute control. Someone questions the need and logic behind taken an unproven vaccine, therefor you must take it for that reason alone?

                          [QUOTE=disneysteve;n725967]
                          I think the main thing everyone should be doing is continuing to wear masks indoors and in crowds.
                          [/QUOTE]

                          Fauci, himself stated mask were pointless.

                          [QUOTE=disneysteve;n725967]
                          Over 900 people who attended an outdoor music festival that required either vaccination, proof of immunity, or a negative test, all came up positive for COVID after the festival.
                          [/QUOTE]

                          So... you're saying the antivaxers are right?

                          There are 300 Million people in the United States. 50% of the population has been immunized. Atleast 10% have had the virus, and the number is probably double to triple that.

                          Despite my reservations I did get the vaccine just because I couldn't see a down side to it. I've worn a mask on exactly three occasions, each time while in a hospital over the past year and a half and that's it. I eat out on a regular basis and I have not adjusted my personal routines in the least.

                          If you want to get a new vaccination every other month go for it, I'm sure Pfizer would love to sale you another dose. I hope you pay for it out of pocket, instead of burdening the tax payer or the insurance company members. If you think wearing a mask, especially after you've been vaccinated, protects you, go for it, but don't expect me to accept your the delusional reality.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            On the news a guy was in-patient for COVID and interviewed and asked if he would reconsider taking the vaccine. He still didn’t want it. I guess he won’t need it now having antibodies.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              [QUOTE=QuarterMillionMan;n726199]On the news a guy was in-patient for COVID and interviewed and asked if he would reconsider taking the vaccine. He still didn’t want it. I guess he won’t need it now having antibodies.[/QUOTE]

                              The great thing is the people who refuse the vaccine because it "only" has emergency use authorization but when they end up with COVID, they demand the monoclonal antibody treatment, which also "only" has EUA.
                              Steve

                              * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                              * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                              * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                [QUOTE=QuarterMillionMan;n726199]On the news a guy was in-patient for COVID and interviewed and asked if he would reconsider taking the vaccine. He still didn’t want it. I guess he won’t need it now having antibodies.[/QUOTE]

                                And people who have had COVID still need the vaccine, but it's recommended that they wait 90 days after their infection.
                                Steve

                                * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
                                * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
                                * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X