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non-taxable methods to make charitable donations? (US)

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    non-taxable methods to make charitable donations? (US)

    Hello everyone, I'm popping in here in the hopes of finding out what programs the US tax law may have for charitable donations. I (somewhat) recently graduated from college, have a good job, and finally have enough income that I can afford to make donations. I'm looking for a means to do so in a way that seas as much money as possible going to the charity of my choice and not to the US government (no offense to Uncle Sam, but I can give it to worthy causes just as well as him, without the 35% lost to overhead expenses).

    I know of course that I can take a deduction for charitable donations on my taxes, but that doesnít help me if I decide to take the standard deduction rather than itemizing; plus it feels somewhat restrictive. I'm sure the US must have other programs for charitable donations out there, but so far I have run into a dead end on Google searching for them. I was hoping someone here could give me a link to a site listing such options, or the name of some options that I can Google to get the details on.

    Specifically what I would like is something similar to the UK's "give as you earn" program where money is automatically deducted from your paycheck (pre tax obviously). Ideally something similar to a charitable version of a 401K, where the money goes, untaxed, into an account where I can continue to invest it and earn more (untaxed) interest until I decide when/where I want to donate it. Of course so far I havenít been able to find any hint of either program existing within the US....

    #2
    many employers have deductions for the united way... check with your employer

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      #3
      I don't know the details but you can set up a charitable trust where you would deposit money in the trust and then direct where the funds go. I don't know how those are handled for tax purposes, though.
      Steve

      * Despite the high cost of living, it remains very popular.
      * Why should I pay for my daughter's education when she already knows everything?
      * There are no shortcuts to anywhere worth going.

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        #4
        give items direct

        I know this is an old thread...But, I have been doing work in Joplin--cleanup and rebuilding from last years tornado.

        Many who are concerned about the money going where they want it, instead of to Uncle Sam are giving ITEMS instead of cash. We had a couple who gave a generator, another an air compressor and air tools and many other tools to the organization I work with. Those tools in turn are used to rebuild homes for people who had no insurance.

        People have also taking the families who are getting the new or rebuilt home shopping to pick out clothes or furniture, then giving it to the organization who then turns around and gives it to the family. That way, it ALL goes to the intended reciepent and there is a 501 c recipt given.

        A local dog shelter does the same here-gives you a receipt for unopened bags of dogfood--you just show them your receipt and they put the value of the dogfood on the receipt they issue based on what you paid for it.

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          #5
          i guess it all depends on how much you want to donate. i would recommend setting up a trust account like the previous poster suggested

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            #6
            All you will need to itemize your tax come back contributions on schedule A of the 1040 form type while you are about to file your taxes. Your non-profit charitable donations will help so many ó and perform to your advantages as well. We wish that you'll consider a contribution and donation in this season.

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